Christogenea Internet Radio

Every Friday night at 8:PM Eastern. Hear Christian Identity explained from Scripture like you have never heard it before! Listen on Talkshoe or here on Christogenea streaming radio.

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Explaining Two-Seedline, Part 14: The non-Adamic Races in Scripture

 
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The Epistles of Paul - Romans Part 3, 04-18-2014

 
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The Epistles of Paul - Romans Part 3, 04-18-2014

Before continuing with our presentation of Paul's epistle to the Romans, it is necessary to be reminded of the scope of the epistle, which includes an understanding of who it was written to, for whom Paul's words were intended. We cannot imagine that we may pick up and read a letter written to one particular party, and that we can then substitute any other party in its references unless the letter itself makes such an explicit allowance in its own expressions.

Paul's epistle was addressed to Romans, and these Romans were pagans, and not merely Judaean (meaning Jewish in this instance) inhabitants of Rome. This is apparent as Paul states that they had “reverenced and served the creation rather than the Creator” because they had fashioned idols out of living creatures, and such things could not be said of Judaeans. However it is also quite evident that the Romans themselves were of the ancient dispersions of Israel, since Paul tells them “that which is to be known of Yahweh is visible among them, since Yahweh has made it known to them”, and those things may only be said of ancient Israel. Paul also told them that “knowing Yahweh, they thought of Him not as God, nor were they thankful” and that “they changed the estimation of the incorruptible Yahweh into a resemblance of an image of corruptible man, and birds, and four-legged animals, and reptiles”, things which could only be said of ancient Israelites who at some point turned to paganism, which is indeed explained of ancient Israel in the books of the Old Testament. So Paul was writing to Romans, and the Romans were descended from Abraham through Jacob-Israel, and his own writing in his epistle is proof enough of the truth of that statement. There is much more in the chapters to come, and these things can also be demonstrated from an examination of the Old Testament and ancient history.

Open Lines Call-in

 
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The Epistles of Paul - Romans Part 2, 04-04-2014

 
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The Epistles of Paul - Romans Part 2, 04-04-2014

Presenting the first half of Romans chapter 1 last week, we left off with verse 17 and Paul's citation of Habakkuk 2:4 where he says that “the just shall live by faith”. In commenting upon that citation, we established that in the context of the original remark as it is found in Habakkuk, the statement intends to describe the righteous of those of the children of Israel who were going to be taken into Babylonian captivity. Because the Law had failed when the rulers and priests of Israel began to deal unjustly, the people were fated to be oppressed and forced to live under the laws of Babylon, a situation which was to endure for an appointed time. In Ezekiel chapter 21 we have corroboration for this interpretation, where Yahweh said He will cut off from the land of Israel both the righteous and the wicked. From Habakkuk chapter 2: “3 For the vision is yet for an appointed time, but at the end it shall speak, and not lie: though it tarry, wait for it; because it will surely come, it will not tarry. 4 Behold, his soul which is lifted up is not upright in him: but the just shall live by his faith.” In the epistle to the Romans, Paul was teaching the fulfillment of these words in Habakkuk, which is assured where the prophet wrote “in the end it shall speak”, meaning that the fulfillment would indeed become evident. Paul is showing us that fulfillment is in the turning of the dispersed children of Israel to Christ. This is why, in the next several chapters of this epistle, Paul demonstrates that those of Israel who are just in the eyes of God are not manifest in a keeping of the rituals of the Law, but instead they are manifest by a turning to the faith of Christ along with an exhibition of the law which Yahweh promised would be written in their hearts. The next few verses of this first chapter of Romans fully demonstrate that the children of Israel, and no others, certainly remain the focus of the Gospel message.

The Epistles of Paul - Romans Part 1, 03-28-2014

 
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The Epistles of Paul - Romans, Part 1 (with a discussion of the history and purpose of the Christogenea New Testament), Christogenea Internet Radio 03-28-2014

Beginning a presentation on the epistles of Paul, I am going to first reiterate a lengthy explanation of some of the basic principles and methods which I have sincerely attempted to adhere to since I began my theological journey nearly 18 years ago. Even though this marks the mid-point of the New Testament Commentary which I hope to complete here on these Friday evenings, which I had begun in early 2011 with the Gospel of Matthew, a translation of Paul is where I actually began the work which had eventually become the Christogenea New Testament, about 15 years ago.

The translations found in the Christogenea New Testament began as an endeavor to present the letters of Paul in a manner as true to the common usage of the Greek language as was possible for me, in concert with a full consideration of the entire Biblical context and the history of the people of the Book, and in English as plainly and as clearly as my ability afforded. The translations are not expected to be perfect. The Greek manuscripts themselves are far from ideal, and for that reason alone no New Testament translation can achieve perfection. They reflect my best effort, based upon not only the resources that I have used, but also upon a full acceptance of the historicity of the Old Testament and the validity of the prophets, selected extra-Biblical writings, and ancient history as recorded by the various branches of our race: for history certainly does not conflict with the Bible, once its peoples are properly identified and its context properly understood.

Micah, Part 5 - Christogenea Internet Radio 03-21-2014

 
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Micah, Part 5 - Christogenea Internet Radio 03-21-2014

In the first three chapters of Micah, we saw the prophet pronounce the judgments of God upon Israel, and also upon Judah, for the many transgressions they committed against both Him and their kinsmen. For those transgressions they would lose all of which they had, because they dealt deceitfully with their God and their nation. From Micah 1:6 and 9: “6 Therefore I will make Samaria as an heap of the field, and as plantings of a vineyard: and I will pour down the stones thereof into the valley, and I will discover the foundations thereof. 9 For her wound is incurable; for it is come unto Judah; he is come unto the gate of my people, even to Jerusalem.” The Assyrians did take away all of Israel and all of the fenced cities and towns of Judah, but they were stopped at the gate of Jerusalem. While Micah also prophesied later, at the end of his third chapter, that “Jerusalem shall become heaps,” that judgment was reserved for execution until the time of the later Chaldaean invasion.

The names of the towns of Judah which Micah prophesied against also told a story in their meanings, from which we can gather deeper insight. For instance, the beginning of sin for Israel was their belief that they were invincible because their God was with them, an idea encapsulated in Micah's utterance concerning Lachish and which is also stated explicitly at Micah 3:11 where it says of the false prophets that “yet will they lean upon the LORD, and say, Is not the LORD among us? none evil can come upon us.”. The children of Israel cannot sin and feel that they can prevail simply because their God is with them, but this was the attitude which Micah ascribes to them. It must also be observed, that that those who understood and were sorrowful over Israel's sin had hoped for good, but Israel was only worthy of Yahweh's judgment, an idea which we see encapsulated in Micah's utterance concerning Maroth.

In the fourth and fifth chapters of Micah, we saw what would become of Israel “in the last days”, in those days which followed her impending captivity at the hand of the Assyrians. Micah chapter 4 expresses these things, and ends with the words “Arise and thresh, O daughter of Zion”. Then Micah chapter 5 expresses these same things in a different manner, and ends with the words “so will I destroy thy cities [meaning the cities of Israel]. And I will execute vengeance in anger and fury upon the heathen”. These prophecies have other prophetic parallels in Ezekiel, Isaiah, Obadiah and elsewhere, but especially in the Revelation.

Martin Luther on the Jews, Part 5

 
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The text of Luther's treatise is found here: Luther: On the Jews and Their Lies. The portion addressed in this presentation is from the latter half of Part II.

Micah, Part 4 - Christogenea Internet Radio 03-14-2014

 
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Micah, Part 4 - Christogenea Internet Radio 03-14-2014

In Micah chapter 4 we see that Yahweh God in the time of His choosing ultimately prevails over all of His enemies, because even though His people Israel were going into captivity, they would indeed be established as a great nation which in the “last days” would be exalted above all other nations. However we also saw that first the children of Israel must go to Babylon, and there they must await their redemption, where suffering many things they were portrayed as a woman in travail. We discussed how Babylon in that vision is not a reference to the place itself, but rather it must be a reference to something which transcends geography. That woman, we pointed out while discussing Micah 4:10-11, is the same woman as the woman of the visions in Revelation chapters 12 and 17, where Israel the bride flees into the wilderness, for which we can also compare Micah 4:7, and later becomes the whore of Babylon. Yet Micah chapter 4 holds out a promise of hope for the children of God, that they shall one day indeed “arise and thresh”, to be the instruments by which Yahweh gathers His enemies as “sheaves to the floor”.

However here in Micah chapter 5 the focus of the prophecy seems to once again be on the more immediate trials which the children of Israel must face, where a siege is laid against them and where the “judge of Israel”, which must be a reference to God Himself, is smitten upon the cheek. Yet this would be an incomplete assessment. Rather, here in Micah chapter 5 apparently we see a prophecy of the more immediate results of those judgments which were pronounced upon Israel by the prophet in the first three chapters of his writing, however the elements of this chapter are also relevant to Micah chapter 4, and what we have here is a Hebrew parallelism. Parallelism is a common element of Biblical literature, whereby the same subject is described twice using somewhat different terms. A simple form of parallelism is found in Psalm 119:105: “Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.” The phrases “lamp unto my feet” and “light unto my path” both essentially mean the same thing, and both describe “thy word”, but the parallelism is a poetic device used for emphasis, which can also make for beautiful poetry. The Bible, both New Testament and Old, is replete with such language. From Revelation 1:8: “I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, saith the Lord, which is, and which was, and which is to come, the Almighty.” Here we shall hopefully see that while much of Micah chapter 5 is pertinent to the time immediate to Micah and what was to befall Israel at the hand of the Assyrians, elements of it are also parallel to the prophecy of Micah chapter 4, the Assyrians being a type for the nations to be gathered against Israel in the “last days”. This is parallelism on a grander scale that the simple one-verse forms which we have just illustrated.

Micah 5:1 Now gather thyself in troops, O daughter of troops: he hath laid siege against us: they shall smite the judge of Israel with a rod upon the cheek.

Micah, Part 3 - Christogenea Internet Radio 03-07-2014

 
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Micah, Part 3 - Christogenea Internet Radio 03-07-2014

In the first three chapters of Micah we saw pronouncements of judgment upon Israel and Judah, judgment which would carry all the way to the “gate of Jerusalem”. We discussed the fulfillment of those judgments in the Assyrian invasions which were not long after Micah had begun preaching. The kingdom of Israel would be lost, and the people of Israel had no recourse in the matter: they would lose all of their possessions and be carried off into captivity. Much of Judah was also decreed by Yahweh to suffer likewise, and they were also carried into captivity by the Assyrians. However in this fourth chapter of Micah the focus of the prophet changes, and his prophesies move from the imminent destruction of ancient Israel and Judah to a vision foretelling what it was that would befall them in their future.

Micah 4:1 But in the last days it shall come to pass, that the mountain of the house of the LORD shall be established in the top of the mountains, and it shall be exalted above the hills; and people shall flow unto it.

The phrase “the last days”, as it is often rendered in the King James Version, contains the Hebrew word achariyth, Strong's Hebrew Lexicon number 319, and it is defined by Strong to mean “the last or end, hence the future; also posterity”. For reason of its meaning it was translated in the King James Version in a wide variety of ways, but it does not only pertain to the very end of the age, which in the Christian worldview means the time imminent to the Second Advent, although achariyth is generally and wrongly interpreted in such a manner. In fact, the apostles called their very own time the “last days” (Acts 2:17, Hebrews 1:2, 1 John 2:18), while at the same time they also considered the “last days” to be far off in the future in relation to their own time (2 Timothy 3:1, James 5:3, 1 Peter 1:5, 2 Peter 3:3, Jude 18). Therefore the meaning of the phrase is relative to its context. This is also evident in Genesis chapter 49, where in Jacob's prophecy concerning his sons he says “Gather yourselves together, that I may tell you that which shall befall you in the last days.” If the things that befell Jacob's sons happened throughout all of the time immediately subsequent to Jacob and continued to happen well into the future, then the same thing is true here, and the references to “the last days” in Micah and in Isaiah, where we find a similar prophecy, began in the period of time following the judgment and deportations of ancient Israel.

Assessing the Ukraine Situation - Christogenea Internet Radio 02-28-2014

 
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What follows are the rough notes which were prepared and employed for this presentation. They are of course incomplete, and not all of the notes were used. I thought I should post them here nevertheless. There may be a Saxon Messenger editorial which follows. These notes were made prior to the development of certain events discussed in the program.

BRIEF Discussion of Ukranian National politics, Ukranian Presidents:

1st — Leonid Kravchuk (1991–1994): A Communist Party politician all his life, he declared Ukraine independent from the crumbling Soviet Union in 1991. The Soviet bureaucratic infrastructure was retained. Kravchuk was not a freedom-lover or an innovator, but was rather a compromise between Soviet traditionalists (conservatives) and reformers.

After leaving office, Kravchuk joined a business and political group known as Kiev Holding or the Dynamo Group. This group, led by oligarchs Viktor Medvedchuk (pro-Soviet Ukranian lawyer) and Hryhoriy Surkis (Ukranian Jew businessman and politician), is formally organized as the Social Democratic Party of Ukraine (marginalized since Orange Revolution). Despite its formal centrist/social-democratic slogans, the party is widely associated with big business, organized crime, corruption, and media bias.

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