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On the Revelation of Yahshua Christ, Part 1: An Introduction

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On the Revelation of Yahshua Christ, Part 1: An Introduction

Here, after eleven years, we shall revisit our commentary on the Revelation of Yahshua Christ with a new presentation, and of course it shall be based on the text as it is presented in the Christogenea New Testament. Our first version of this commentary was originally presented in fourteen podcasts from December of 2010 through April of 2011. While there are several reasons for wanting to replace our old commentary, here I will only state that I hope to expand some portions of the original while also offering some clarifications, rewriting or further expounding on some of our explanations. I also hope to more thoroughly cross-reference portions of parallel prophecies which are found in the books of the prophets, especially in Ezekiel, Daniel, Obadiah, Zechariah and Malachi.

Later that same year I first published Christreich, which is the title of a book which had encapsulated the original podcast commentary. While we hope this new commentary will be more comprehensive, I do not foresee adding much to the interpretations themselves. But while I cannot yet rule that out completely, I do not think that this new version will invalidate anything I had written there, except for one note which must be corrected at Revelation chapter 20, verse 5, which I shall discuss further below. This commentary, and even this introduction, shall be founded on the edited text of Christreich rather than the notes for the original podcasts. For that reason, I was tempted to title this series “Christreich 2.0” or something similar, but I decided to stay with our more traditional scheme. That title may be appropriate if Yahweh God permits me to publish a second edition of the book, something which I certainly hope to achieve.

Treasure in Earthen Vessels, A Review of a Sermon by Wesley Swift

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Treasure in Earthen Vessels, A Review of a Sermon by Wesley Swift

It is relatively easy for a Christian to maintain his faith and to profess his beliefs so long as he enjoys worldly comforts, and so long as his faith is never really tried. But once some trial does come along, there is a very real danger that a man may forsake his beliefs and run off into some heresy, thereby being tried all the more, and in the long run, exposing himself to an even much greater degree of suffering and anguish. This year we have had several friends who have lost loved ones, and we have also lost several friends. We will miss them, but we have comfort in the fact that they are not truly lost. As Christians, we have an assurance, and we of all others should know with confidence, that all of our true friends are alive in Christ, that if we are in Him, we shall all one day be reunited. As Paul of Tarsus wrote in Romans chapter 6, “5 For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection…”

However one event troubles us greatly, that one dear friend has fallen off in despair at the sudden loss of a loved one, and had also questioned why he suffered such a trial in spite of his service to our Christian Identity community. So we are afraid that in his pursuit of the unknowable, because my own answers to him did not seem to satisfy his demands for knowledge, that he has either abandoned his faith completely, or has gone off into some heresy. Therefore, while we share the grief of our friend, we also grieve for him, because we are afraid that we have lost him. It is one thing if he turned away from us, but it is a terrible thing if he turned away from God. Peter himself had warned of the trials which we would face in spite of our faith, in chapter 4 of his first epistle: “12 Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you: 13 But rejoice, inasmuch as ye are partakers of Christ's sufferings; that, when his glory shall be revealed, ye may be glad also with exceeding joy.”

In the End, there are only Jews or Nazis

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In the End, there are only Jews or Nazis

Sometimes when I do a presentation such as this, I feel as if I am just speaking to the choir, and so do many of our friends and listeners. But that is not entirely true. According to Cloudflare, these past few months Christogenea has been getting in excess of 250,000 visitors each week, with as many as 400,000 page views. This year, the main Christogenea website alone is on track to exceed 3.2 million file downloads, which is up over 10 percent from last year. The Media and Mein Kampf Project websites add another 600,000 to that number, but most of those downloads are videos and not necessarily our own content. From 2017 to 2021, our website traffic has more than tripled. But the point is that we never know who we are reaching, as that is all in the hands of Yahweh our God, but each year we have been able to reach many more people than we have in past years.

Just yesterday, a long-time friend who was also the first contact on a new Twitter account which I opened just about six weeks ago had asked me about a reference I made in a paper I wrote in prison in 2007, or perhaps even earlier, which was titled The Problem With Genesis 6:1-4. He asked about the alternate reading of the Greek text of Genesis 6:2 which I had supplied from Brenton’s Septuagint in a note citing the Codex Alexandrinus. Of course, being in prison that was my only resource for the citation at that time. But my friend did us a favor, because he himself found another publication of the Greek Septuagint from 1887 which contained the variation in Brenton’s note in his text.

So I decided to spend a few hours, which ended up consuming most of my day, diving into a facsimile copy of the Codex Alexandrinus which I found free online at the website for the British Museum, and deciphering the Greek of the Codex for myself, so I could see whether Brenton’s note, and the reading in Henry Barclay Swete’s Old Testament in Greek according to the Septuagint were accurate. With that, I made a sort of infographic from the manuscript, and assembled an article of nearly 1500 words in English and Greek that I could publish at Christogenea as an addendum for my 2007 paper. I began that endeavor in the morning, and I finished at around 5:30 PM. Much of that time was spent deciphering the Codex, which is very slow and painstaking work, and much more painstaking for me because I do not do it frequently enough.

The Ordering and Chronology of the Ministry and Epistles of Paul, Part 2: The Prison Epistles

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The Ordering and Chronology of the Ministry and Epistles of Paul, Part 2: The Prison Epistles

As I had explained in the opening presentation in this short series, I had hoped to gather into one place my interpretations of the time and place of the writing of each of the epistles of Paul of Tarsus, as well as a general chronology of the events recorded in the Book of Acts. I had also originally hoped to do that in a single presentation, but it was just not possible. So while we have discussed what I have called Paul’s “travelling epistles”, now we shall discuss the time and place, and also the circumstances, of the writing of the 6 epistles that were written while Paul was a prisoner. Once again, for much of this presentation I am drawing on information which I had already presented in our commentaries for each of the epistles of Paul and in our earlier commentary on the Book of Acts. There are also some new perspectives.

This is important to us for several reasons. First, it is an important reference tool, because in my opinion no other such reference exists which has a truly accurate chronology of the events of the ministry of Paul, the writing of his epistles, and the Book of Acts. As I had also said, there is much misinformation in many popular and supposedly authoritative academic sources concerning the ministry of Paul and the writing of his epistles, and it is convenient to have our own opinions of these things in one single article, or perhaps more accurately, one single source of reference.

But there is one further reason. Once it is realized that we can indeed know where Paul was throughout nearly his entire ministry, that it can all be accounted for in the records of his epistles and in Acts, then we also know where Paul was not. Paul of Tarsus never wrote an epistle to the Egyptians or to the Arabians, or to any other race, and he never visited or preached among them either. There is no Roman Catholic universalism in the ministry or the epistles of Paul, and taking the words “all men” out of context and twisting them into a universalist interpretation is not sufficient evidence. But on the other hand, Paul of Tarsus was never in Britain or Spain, although he had expressed a hope that he may reach western Europe, and the so-called “29th” or “Lost” chapter of Acts is a complete hoax which was perpetrated in recent centuries and used to patronize and to deceive many British Israel and American Christian Identity adherents. We do not need lies to support our assertions or the basis of our faith.

The Ordering and Chronology of the Ministry and Epistles of Paul, Part 1: The Travelling Epistles

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The Ordering and Chronology of the Ministry and Epistles of Paul, Part 1: The Travelling Epistles

Here I hope to gather into one place my interpretations of the time and place of the writing of each of the epistles of Paul of Tarsus. Here we shall discuss the travelling epistles, a name which I am giving to Paul’s first 8 epistles in order to distinguish them from the other 6 which were written while Paul was a prisoner. So for this endeavor, I have collected at least most of the information from what I had already presented in our commentaries for each of the epistles of Paul and in our earlier commentary on the Book of Acts, all of which spanned about a hundred and fifty-five podcast presentations from April, 2013 through December, 2017. This I believe is important as a reference guide, first because we have had a skeleton article on the Ordering and chronology of the epistles of Paul in the References section at Christogenea since August of 2015 which I have long hoped to complete. But more importantly, there is much misinformation in many popular and supposedly authoritative academic sources concerning the ministry of Paul and the writing of his epistles, and it is convenient to have our own opinions of these things in one single article.

Doing this it will seem as if we are taking it for granted that Paul had written all fourteen of the epistles which are commonly attributed to him. But the truth of that assertion should become even more evident as we proceed here, giving our reasons detailing both when and from where each of the epistles were written, and, in certain cases, also as to why they were written. Furthermore, while for different reasons the Christogenea New Testament generally presents Paul’s epistles in the traditional order found in other Bibles, we made exceptions, especially with Hebrews and placed it before the four personal epistles which were addressed to Timothy, Titus and Philemon. That we did in order to make a statement confirming our belief that Paul was indeed the author of the epistle to the Hebrews. But here we shall begin with the earliest epistle which Paul had written, and proceed in the chronological order in which we believe he had written them all.

Dr. Michael Hill of the League of the South, The Charlottesville Fallout

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The Charlottesville Fallout with Dr. Michael Hill

After the aborted Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017, teams of Jewish lawyers from New York and Washington, DC assembled to collect plaintiffs from among the antifa-connected activists and from among the supposed victims of the James Fields auto wreck in order to file a lawsuit against all groups and organizing parties attending the rally. We have been waiting for the trial and outcome of the case ever since, and now the first stage has finally come to pass.

On November 23rd a jury in Charlottesville handed down a split verdict in the Unite the Right lawsuit trial, where they could not reach a decision on the first two claims in the suit, which are the most important claims. They are related to whether or not there was a conspiracy in violation of Federal law, based on the so-called 1871 Ku Klux Klan Act. In my opinion, if there was really such a conspiracy, or if such a conspiracy was provable, there would most likely have been federal charges. However the grounds for claims 3 and 4 of the suit were based on a State of Virginia conspiracy law citing a supposed conspiracy to intimidate, harass or harm on the part of all of the defendants, and whether there was also a more specific conspiracy to commit racial, religious or ethnic harrassment or violence, on the part of some of the defendants. Once again, there were never any criminal charges related to those claims at the state level.

On the Song of Songs: Part 5, Reflections (Solomon as Prophet)

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On the Song of Songs: Part 5, Reflections (Solomon as Prophet)

This evening I am going to do something different. Having completed our presentation of the Song of Songs, there are still further observations which we can make, and which we should make, regarding the Song in general, and especially the impact of its interpretation on various other Scriptures from Genesis through the New Testament. While we have explained or alluded to some of these aspects of the Song throughout our commentary, it may be useful to have them all in summary, and also so that we may expand on some of them to a much greater degree, further probing the depths of their meanings.

The wisdom of Solomon is evidently far greater than many men may even have the ability to perceive. The Song of Songs is not a mere love song, although it is often dismissed as such. Both Jews and Churches have offered allegorical explanations of the Song which suit themsleves, and they all fail. In opposition to them all, but similarly to the claims of some, we would assert that the Song is an allegory representing the love which Yahweh God has for the children of Israel, and the love which the children of Israel, both individually and collectively, should have for Yahweh their God, as they are His Bride, and He Himself has promised to betroth them both once again and forever. I refer primarily to Hosea chapter 2: “19 And I will betroth thee unto me for ever; yea, I will betroth thee unto me in righteousness, and in judgment, and in lovingkindness, and in mercies. 20 I will even betroth thee unto me in faithfulness: and thou shalt know the LORD.” That promise being made to Israel in the Assyrian captivities, the betrothal is certainly fulfilled in Christ. So at the same time, the Song offers some prophecy concerning Christ, which only Christians, and not Jews, can even begin to understand.

On the Song of Songs: Part 4, the Consequences (White is Beautiful, and White is Godly)

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On the Song of Songs: Part 4, the Consequences (White is Beautiful, and White is Godly)

We titled our presentation of chapters 5 and 6 of the Song of Songs as The Conclusion, adding the assertion in the parenthetical subtitle that Two Seedline is Biblical Truth. The statement may be puzzling to some who may not be fully acquainted with all of the ideological differences among Identity Christians, but it is meant to indicate that the Song supports, and even corroborates, our interpretations of the idioms of Genesis chapter 3, which we have often explained portrays an account of sexual seduction and resulting fornication. However while that is one conclusion we made from our study of the text of the Song it is not the conclusion of the Song itself. Now, as we do present the final two chapters of the Song, we will see even further corroboration for the veracity of our interpretation.

Throughout our presentation of the Song, we were also able to make conclusions which are important to a proper understanding of Biblical anthropology, that the subjects of the Song must have been of the White or Caucasian race. We will also see further evidence of that here in chapter 7. Properly, only White people can be described as being ruddy, or as having skin like ivory, or legs like pillars of marble, as we saw in the Bride’s description of the Husband in Song chapter 5 in reference to his belly and his legs. These same descriptions also further reinforce the assertion that the Song contains allegories describing sexual relations, where the Husband speaks of eating fruit from a garden, the garden being the Bride herself, or where the Bride celebrated the eating of fruit from an apple tree, which in turn was a reference to the Husband. That is evident where in the the physical descriptions the lovers are portrayed as comparing parts of one another’s nude bodies to those various natural elements, such as ivory or marble.

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