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Ecclesiastes, Part 2: Vanity and Deliverance

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Ecclesiastes, Part 2: Vanity and Deliverance

Presenting the opening chapters of Ecclesiastes, we showed how this work was attributed to King Solomon from the earliest times, and also how it accords very well with the life of Solomon, once we realize that it must have been written in the later part of his life. Only in the life of Solomon do we find someone who could have had the experiences of this writer, who called himself the Preacher but who also claimed to be a son of David and king over all Israel. Then in addition to these assertions, there is also the confession of an abundantly opulent lifestyle which the historical Scriptures describe for us in the life of Solomon. Writing this book, the Preacher is now reflecting back on that life and assessing its value.

Ecclesiastes was written to lament the plight of man, that none of the works of man seem to be of any benefit to him at the end of his life, because he must leave the fruits of them to others. Realizing this, the Preacher turned to mirth and decadence, but neither did he find any satisfaction in those things. Making our own assessment of his words, we explained that the Preacher had purposely employed skepticism as a teaching method throughout his discourse. All is vanity, he proclaimed, but what he really meant to say is that all is vanity without God, something which is further revealed to us as we make our way through these subsequent chapters of his work.

Ecclesiastes is poorly understood by many Bible readers, since the skepticism it expresses is often mistaken for Scriptural truth. But rather, that skepticism is merely used as a literary device in order to demonstrate that without God, man has no hope at all. Regardless of what he does with his life, in the end he dies like all other men, and all are eventually forgotten. Reading the book, Christians should understand that the conclusions of the skeptic are wrong, because there is a God. The Preacher makes that expression where he declares the importance of keeping the Law. Here in this chapter, chapter 3 of Ecclesiastes, the Preacher informs us that it is God who subjected man to this travail, for man to be exercised in vanity. If man is being purposely exercised in vanity, then there must be something for him beyond this life, or the exercise itself would be in vain. Here we must ask, does even God act in vain?

Ecclesiastes, Part 1: Methods of The Preacher

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Ecclesiastes, Part 1: Methods of The Preacher

Before beginning a commentary on Ecclesiastes, let me first make the confession that none of my commentaries on Scripture are founded on worldly learning. I never went to Bible school, I never studied other mens’ commentaries, and I have little idea what the supposedly learned men say about most aspects of Scripture, or about individual books of Scripture. Neither am I going to research any of them for any particular commentary. With only a few exceptions, on the infrequent occasions where I have tried to read a popular commentary on a portion of Scripture, I have been disappointed, and sometimes even angered by what I have seen. For the most part, my only experience with the popular commentaries is through the editing work which I have done for Clifton Emahiser, who quotes from them frequently.

So when I write my own commentaries, I seek out only what information I can glean from or about the oldest available manuscripts, and I base my commentaries on what I have come to understand from Scripture itself and from classical histories and whatever I remember from my own readings of these and other works, such as the apocryphal literature or the ancient inscriptions of the neighboring cultures. Therefore, whether I say anything new, or whether I repeat anything old, for me to contend with or to mimic any of the traditional commentaries is not premeditated. Rather, I only seek to provide a discussion of Scripture through the lens of that proper covenant theology which is found in our Christian Identity understanding.

However, in my readings of archaeological journals and other worldly sources I am familiar with at least many of the claims of the critics of Scripture. Concerning this particular book, Ecclesiastes, they point to Aramaic or Persian words or other seemingly foreign aspects of its language, and they assert their own interpretation of these things in order to cast doubt upon the veracity of authorship, whether it be claimed or attributed. Here I will only state that their presumptions do not make inevitable their conclusions, as other reasons may also be given to explain the circumstances. The ancient Hebrews did not live in a vacuum, and often they did have foreign influences. For that they were even chastised by Yahweh their God. The ancient Hebrews themselves also greatly influenced the surrounding nations. Under David, and for a long time after David, they did indeed occupy and rule over all of the lands from the River of Egypt to the Euphrates River, and at least as far north as Hamath. So Solomon ruled over a great part of the Aramaic speakers of his time.

Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 5: Censure and Exhortation

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Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 5: Censure and Exhortation

This will be the 121st presentation in our commentaries on the Epistles of Paul of Tarsus, and, at least for now, it shall be the final segment of the series. Here we conclude an endeavor which we began on March 28th, 2014, with our first presentation on the epistle to the Romans. We praise Christ for having had the opportunity to do this, and we pray that all of those unrighteous skeptics of Paul’s epistles take the time to read or listen to this work. As we have said many times in the past, Paul’s epistles were the glue by which the message of reconciliation in the Gospel of Christ was adhered to the lost sheep of the Houses of Judah and Israel – the anciently scattered tribes who are those for whom Christ had come. The importance of this within the greater history of our Adamic race cannot be overlooked. In the history of Israel, Paul was every bit as important as any of the ancient prophets – for it is he who truly understood and taught the relevance of the prophecies and histories of the children of Israel in the light of the Gospel of Christ, even if the world has been blind to the truth of this message for at least the last 1800 years. In the formative years of the Roman Church, imperialism prevailed over identity.

Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 4: No Mercy for Narcissists

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Aside from the first three presentations of this epistle, perhaps last Saturday’s program, The Gospel of Goddard? Or the Gospel of Christ?, would be a good prerequisite for this program, as there is a fair amount of convergence in the subject matter.

Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 4: No Mercy for Narcissists

So far in our presentations of this second epistle to Timothy, we have focused on Paul’s declaration of The Nullification of Death which is in Christ Yahshua, an understanding of which should in turn lead us to Rejecting the Religion of Fear. Then we discussed his admonition in regard to Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, especially in relation to those earlier subjects. While there are other topics which Paul has discussed here, we chose to illustrate these themes to a greater extent because they are representative of some of the most important components of Paul’s messages throughout all of his epistles. For example, he explains in Romans chapter 5 and 1 Corinthians chapter 15 both what the nullification of death means to our Adamic race, and why and how it shall be effected. Then he adds to those explanations with certain statements and allegories which he had made in 1 Corinthians chapters 3 and 5 and elsewhere. So here we have endeavored to show that Paul’s message is consistent from the beginning of his ministry to the end, and that it is also consistent with the oracles of Yahweh found in both the prophets and in the Gospels.

Special Notices to All Who Deny Two-Seedline, Part 24

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Special Notices to All Who Deny Two-Seedline, Part 24

Here we bring our presentation of Clifton Emahiser’s series of Special Notices to All Who Deny Two-Seedline to its conclusion. So far as my records indicate, this twenty-fourth and final notice was completed by Clifton on February 6th, 2003. As we have seen in his earlier portions of this series, Clifton did not really plan on writing so much on the subject, and on the other hand sometimes he thought he would write much more. Instead, he went on in his ministry to do other things, but all of them ultimately relate back to this same subject. There is no subject more important if a Christian really wants to understand not only the Bible, but also the forces which govern the world around us today.

As we proceed this evening, we shall hear Clifton make the assertion that “It is paramount we fathom that Yahweh came in the flesh; dwelt among us in the flesh; was bruised in the flesh; died in the flesh; was resurrected after three days in the flesh; ascended to heaven in the flesh, and will return again to us in the flesh.” Of course, there is no one verse of Scripture which informs us of this, however there are many verses which inform us of one aspect or the other, so Clifton is offering a compilation. For instance, we read in Hebrews chapter 2 that Christ “took on … the seed of Abraham”, and in Romans chapter 9 that Christ “was made of the seed of David according to the flesh”, so Clifton may indeed assert that Yahweh “came in the flesh”. Likewise we read in John chapter 1 that “14 … the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us…” so Clifton says here that Yahweh “dwelt among us in the flesh”.

Then in Luke chapter 24 we see the following exchange, where Christ appeared to the apostles many days after His resurrection, and it says: “36 And as they thus spake, Jesus himself stood in the midst of them, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you. 37 But they were terrified and affrighted, and supposed that they had seen a spirit. 38 And he said unto them, Why are ye troubled? and why do thoughts arise in your hearts? 39 Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself: handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have.” So Clifton can certainly assert that Yahshua Christ “was resurrected after three days in the flesh”. Then where we see in the Gospel of John that Christ after His resurrection had told Thomas to “Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing”, we see Clifton has grounds for asserting that Yahshua Christ was “bruised in the flesh”.

Special Notices to All Who Deny Two-Seedline, Part 23

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Last week I was reading a Social Media page on Google+ which belongs to someone that I count as a friend, and I became quite disappointed when I saw him complain in one of his posts that Christian Identity does not have a “real leader”. That is news to me, as I never imagined that we did not have a “real leader”. Thirty-five centuries ago, our people rejected Yahweh as their King, and they demanded an earthly king, as it is recorded in 1 Samuel chapter 8. Our people demanded an earthly king, and Yahweh gave them one. Then He warned them just how much they would suffer under such a king. But they didn’t care, they demanded one in spite of the warning. So four hundred years later, after earthly kings drove both the houses of Israel and Judah ioff nto sin, in Hosea He said “9 O Israel, thou hast destroyed thyself; but in me is thine help. 10 I will be thy king: where is any other that may save thee in all thy cities? and thy judges of whom thou saidst, Give me a king and princes? 11 I gave thee a king in mine anger, and took him away in my wrath.”

It was a sin for our people to ask for a king, and we have no reconciliation to God until we repent of that sin. Now Christ is King, and He is our only legitimate King. Even Paul of Tarsus set such an example in his second epistle to the Corinthians, where after he chastised them for certain things which they had done wrong he said “24 Not for that we have dominion over your faith, but are helpers of your joy: for by faith ye stand.” Paul only taught them the Scriptures, and he expected them to be able to correct themselves. That is because Christ is King, as Yahshua Christ told us in the Gospel of Matthew, “8 But be not ye called Rabbi: for one is your Master, even Christ; and all ye are brethren. 9 And call no man your father upon the earth: for one is your Father, which is in heaven. 10 Neither be ye called masters: for one is your Master, even Christ. 11 But he that is greatest among you shall be your servant.”

The Christian assemblies of Rome and Corinth were small and local home churches formed around extended families and neighborhoods which chose their own leaders from their own community elders, from the natural patriarchy, and Paul of Tarsus would not rule over any of them. Neither should any of us seek to rule over our own brethren. Identity Christians should have only Christ as their King, and not seek positions of power or authority for themselves. Rather, we should only seek to serve one another, as Christ had said, aspiring to the idea that “he that is greatest among you shall be your servant”, as He was our servant.

Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 3: Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth

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Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 3: Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth

In the first two presentations of this epistle, we discussed at length the nullification of death which is promised in Christ, and the need to reject the religion of fear which was first taught by the Pharisees, then capitalized upon by the Roman Catholic Church, and which is now being used for advantage throughout all of the denominational churches, to keep the people in bondage to sin and death. But each and every member of our White Adamic race has a promise of eternal life, because it was for that reason that we were created, and Yahweh our God cannot fail. For that same reason, however, we must cease from sin, lest our eternal life be an existence spent in a state of everlasting contempt – as it is described in Daniel chapter 12.

However if we love our God, we shall love one another, and then even if we do sin, we have a propitiation in Christ, as the apostle John also explained where he wrote in chapter 2 of his first epistle: “1 My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous: 2 And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world.” Of course, the sins of the world can only be the sins of the children of Israel, as only the children of Israel possessed both the law and these promises of forgiveness, mercy and grace. But John’s world, the world that mattered to him, was the society of the children of Israel. So he distinguished between those who loved God, and those who could not love God, and he said “4 He that saith, I know him, and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him. 5 But whoso keepeth his word, in him verily is the love of God perfected: hereby know we that we are in him. 6 He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked.” As Christ had said in the Gospel to certain of His adversaries, in John chapter 8, “ye seek to kill me, because my word hath no place in you.” Those men were completely disassociated from Him, simply because their origin was not His origin, and because their father was not His Father, as He had explained to them.

Special Notices to All Who Deny Two-Seedline, Part 22

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Special Notices to All Who Deny Two-Seedline, Part 22

As we make our presentation this evening, we shall see Clifton offer a defense of Bertrand L. Comparet, Wesley A. Swift, William P. Gale and Nord Davis. While we can defend these men for their profession of what we call Two-Seedline, we do not have to agree with everything which they taught or said. Rather, we must understand that they were merely men, and that while their studies have helped us tremendously, they were also imperfect, and it is our duty to improve upon their teachings where they themselves fell short. As Paul had said, we all sin – or make mistakes – and therefore we all fall short of the glory of God. But that is not an excuse to be slothful in our scholarship, or to cleave to errors for the sake of men.

I have told this story in various ways in the past, but now I am going to summarize it again: When I became acquainted with Christian Identity in 1997, for about a year I read and appreciated Swift, Comparet, and a host of other Identity writers to whom I am indebted. But when I decided to study it seriously, I wanted to prove it for myself. So by the end of 1998 I set aside all of the Christian Identity materials so that I could concentrate solely on Scripture, language and historical studies that would either prove or destroy what I had read from those other writers. While I did continue to purchase some Identity books and pamphlets after that time, it was mostly only so that I could give them to others who wanted to learn.

Around that same time, I was introduced to the writings of Clifton Emahiser by a good friend and long-time student of Christian Identity named Ralph Daigle. So at Ralph’s insistence, I began to read Clifton’s Watchman’s Teaching Letters. Some time later I became involved with Clifton, after I wrote him several times to contend with him on certain topics. Soon, our relationship grew out of the common understanding that we were both interested in getting to the truth of the matters of Scripture and Christian Identity, and especially Two-Seedline. But even then, I had no concept of what we might accomplish, or how far our relationship would grow.

Over the ensuing years, Clifton and I, along with a couple of other friends, had exchanged letters both evaluating and debating many of the common Identity teachings which were popular at the time, and which are still popular today. Among these are the so-called “6th and 8th Day Creation theory” and the idea that the creation of non-White races is recorded in Scripture. After a great deal of study and discussion of these issues, we now reject those concepts completely, even though they were taught by both Swift and Comparet. While Swift and Comparet taught the so-called “6th and 8th Day Creation theory”, others in Christian Identity who have rejected the notion that the adamic man of Genesis chapter 1 represents the other races have nevertheless conjectured that those other races are found in the chay ‘erets, or beast of the earth, mentioned in that same chapter. We also reject that notion as both unscholarly and unscriptural.

Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 2: Rejecting the Religion of Fear

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Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 2: Rejecting the Religion of Fear

Contrasting the religion of the Sadducees with that of the Pharisees in his Wars of the Judaeans, Book 2, the Judaean historian Flavius Josephus had said “164 But the Sadducees are those who compose the second order, and take away fate entirely, and suppose that God is not concerned in our doing or not doing what is evil; and they say, that to act what is good, or what is evil, 165 is at men's own choice, and that the one or the other belongs so to everyone, that they may act as they please. They also take away the belief of the immortal duration of the soul, and the punishments and rewards in Hades.” Of course, the Pharisees which Josephus wrote about were the successors of those who rejected Christ, and while Christ despised the Sadducees completely, and while for many reasons He had also criticized the doctrines of the Pharisees, the Pharisees nevertheless believed in the eternal spirit of man which the Sadducees had rejected, and the judgement of good and evil.

A few centuries later, following after the model of the Pharisees, the Roman Catholic Church continued the doctrine concerning punishments and rewards in Hades. Then they used that doctrine not only to put fear in the hearts of the people, but to reap profits from them. However speaking of His ἐκκλησία, Christ had said in Matthew chapter 16 that “the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.” Christ was not speaking of an institution when He said that. Rather, the word ἐκκλησία describes those whom He had called, which are the body of the people of Israel, as it was also used throughout the Greek Scriptures. So in Brenton’s Septuagint we read from Psalm 21, which speaks prophetically of Christ Himself: “20 Deliver my soul from the sword; my only-begotten one from the power of the dog. 21 Save me from the lion's mouth; and regard my lowliness from the horns of the unicorns. 22 I will declare thy name to my brethren: in the midst of the church will I sing praise to thee. 23 Ye that fear the Lord, praise him; all ye seed of Jacob, glorify him: let all the seed of Israel fear him.” In that passage the word church is from the plural form of ἐκκλησία, and it refers to the collective masses of the children of Israel. In the King James Version of the Psalms, the corresponding Hebrew word is translated as congregations.

Throughout the Middle Ages, the Roman Catholic Church thrived on a religion of fear, even going so far as to sell indulgences to the people in order to alleviate their fear. The Church had taught people that their departed loved ones were suffering in Hades or in Purgatory – a concept which is missing from Scripture entirely – but that if they paid a certain sum to the Church, their loved ones could be forgiven for their sins, relieved of their sufferings, and pass on to heaven. So the Church was basically bilking the people out of their money by manipulating their consciences with feelings of guilt for reason of their own profit. At the height of an internal debate over the justification of such indulgences, and when the Church practice was ultimately justified by the councils, that is when the Reformation was sparked.

Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 1: The Nullification of Death

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Paul's Second Epistle to Timothy, Part 1: The Nullification of Death

Here we begin our presentation of Paul’s second epistle to Timothy. This is the last in our series of commentaries on the epistles of Paul of Tarsus which we had begun with the epistle to the Romans in the Spring of 2014, and it is now the 117th presentation in this series. Undertaking this endeavor, we did not present Paul’s epistles in chronological order, but rather we found it appropriate, with a couple of exceptions, to present the pastoral epistles to Timothy and Titus last in order of Paul’s epistles, and also present the other epistles as they are ordered in most Bibles. One exception was the epistle to Philemon, which is not truly a pastoral epistle and which in its historical context is connected to the epistle to the Colossians, so we presented it along with that epistle. Another is the epistle to the Hebrews, which was certainly written by Paul although most Bibles order it to follow Paul’s pastoral epistles, preferring to separate it because they are not certain of the authorship. So we moved it to precede Paul’s pastoral epistles, because we are confident that Paul was its author.

If we had presented the epistles of Paul in chronological order, we would have had to begin with the epistles to the Thessalonians which were both written during Paul’s sojourn in Corinth, around 50 or 51 AD as it is recorded in Acts chapter 18. Then the epistle to the Galatians was written during Paul's stay in Antioch which is described in Acts 18:22-23. The first epistle to the Corinthians was written as Paul was planning to end his three-year sojourn in Ephesus in 56 AD, described in Acts chapter 19. As we know from 1 Corinthians, there was another epistle written to the Corinthians which preceded it, but which is now lost, and that was probably also written from Ephesus.

As Paul was journeying through the Troad and Makedonia after leaving Ephesus, he wrote both the epistle to Titus and the first epistle to Timothy, and prepared to spend the winter of 56-57 AD in Nicopolis. During that winter, the second epistle to the Corinthians was written, while both Titus and Timothy had joined him. These events in Paul’s life are briefly recorded at the beginning of Acts chapter 20.

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