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A Christogenea commentary On the Gospel of John is now in progress. Many passages simply do not say what the modern churches think they mean! Don't miss this important and ground-breaking work proving that Christian Identity is indeed fully supported by Scripture.

Don't miss our ongoing series of podcasts The Protocols of Satan, which presents many historical proofs that the infamous Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion are real, and that they have been fulfilled in history by the very same people who dispute their authenticity. Our companion series, The Jews in Medieval Europe, helps to explain how the Protocols have been fulfilled.

 Our recent Pragmatic Genesis series explains the Bible from a Christian Identity perspective which reconciles both Old and New Testaments with history and the political and social realities facing the Christian people of Yahweh God today.

A Commentary on the Epistles of Paul has recently been completed at Christogenea.org. This lengthy and in-depth series reveals the true Paul as an apostle of God, a prophet in his own right, and the first teacher of what we call Christian Identity.

Don't miss our recently-completed series of commentaries on the Minor Prophets of the Bible, which has also been used as a vehicle to prove the historicity of the Bible as well as the Provenance of God.

Visit Clifton Emahiser's Watchman's Teaching Ministries at Christogenea.org for his many foundational Christian Identity studies.

Visit the Mein Kampf Project at Christogenea.org and learn the truth concerning some of the most-lied about events in history.

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Every Friday night at 8:PM Eastern. Hear Christian Identity explained from Scripture like you have never heard it before! Listen on Talkshoe or here on Christogenea streaming radio.

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The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 17

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The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 17 - Christogenea on Talkshoe 10-12-2012

In Luke chapter 16, Christ is recorded as having given a lengthy discourse concerning wealth and the love of mammon, or riches. Beginning with a parable which warns concerning the behavior of the “sons of light” as opposed to the “sons of this age”, He continued with a warning about those forcing their way into the Kingdom of God, and then presented another parable in an example of a wealthy man who had failed to extend assistance to the poor man, Lazarus. All of this actually presents diverse parts of a consistent moral lesson concerning the behavior of the “sons of light”. That they should not act as the “sons of this age” in pursuit of unrighteous riches, wealth obtained through unjust means, that they should be wary of those outsiders forcing their way into the Kingdom of God, and that if they were to become wealthy, they risk losing their own reward in the Kingdom in the event they forsake their brethren as the rich man had not considered the needs of Lazarus.

Studying the history of Christian Europe one should recognize that many from the noble classes thought that it was beneficial to have the anti-Christ jewish usurers around for the sake of commerce. Kings used these jews in the hopes of they themselves profiting from jewish vice and usury. In the meantime the jews acquired great wealth, having the business of usury and capital exclusively to themselves since Christians were barred from such practices. If Christians had only heeded the words of Christ in Luke chapter 16, they may have recognized the connection between the pursuit of wealth and the infiltration and corruption of the Kingdom of God, which has led to the very situation which we suffer today.

1 Then He said to His students: “It is impossible for scandals not to come, but woe to him through whom they come! 2 It would be better for him if a mill stone is placed around his neck and he were cast into the sea than he should be offended by the least one of these!

The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 16

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The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 16 - Christogenea on Talkshoe 10-05-2012

Two weeks ago, following the presentation of Luke chapter 15, I had given an outline of the reasons for the translation of Luke chapter 16 verses 8 and 9 as they appear in the Christogenea New Testament. Here we will summarize the explanation of the Parable of the Unrighteous Steward once more, and begin by reading the verses in question: “8 And the master praised the unrighteous steward because he did wisely, because the sons of this age are wiser than the sons of light are towards their own race. 9 And I say to you, shall you make for yourselves friends from the riches of unrighteousness, that when you should fail they may receive you into eternal dwellings?”

In summary, in verse 8 of the chapter there are two Greek words which practically all, if not all, of the popular translations of Luke fail to render properly. These are αἰών, which here is rendered as age, and γενεά, which is rendered as race. The Greek word αἰών is the word from which we have the English eon. It represents a period of time, and not of space. Therefore it cannot be properly translated as world the way in which we generally understand the word world as it is used today.

1 Then He also said to the students: “There was a certain wealthy man who had a steward, and he had suspected him of squandering his possessions. 2 And calling him he said to him ‘What is this I hear about you? Give me an account of your stewardship, for you are no longer able to be steward.’ 3 And the steward said to himself ‘What shall I do, that my master has taken the stewardship from me? I am not able to dig, and I am ashamed to beg. 4 I know what I shall do, in order that when I have been removed from the stewardship they shall receive me into their houses!’ 5 And calling on each one of those indebted to his master, he said to the first ‘How much do you owe my master?’ 6 And he said ‘A hundred baths of olive oil.’ So he said to him ‘Take your records, and quickly sitting down write fifty.’

The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 16 - The Divorce Discourse, Luke 16:16-18

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The notes to this podcast are already contained here in papers written years ago, Divorce in the Bible and The Divorce Discourse: Luke 16:16-18

The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 15

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The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 15 - Christogenea on Talkshoe 09-21-2012

1 Then all of the tax-collectors and the wrongdoers were approaching Him to hear Him. 2 And both the Pharisees and the scribes were murmuring saying that “He receives wrongdoers and eats together with them!” 3 So He spoke to them this parable, saying: 4 “Which man from among you having a hundred sheep and losing one of them would not leave behind the ninety-nine in the wilderness and go for that which is lost until he should find it? 5 And finding it places it upon his shoulder rejoicing, 6 and coming to the house will call together friends and neighbors saying to them ‘Rejoice with me, because I found my sheep which is lost!’ 7 I say to you that thusly there shall be joy in heaven upon the repenting of one wrongdoer rather than upon ninety-nine righteous who have no need of repentance!

A lot may be said of this allegory, aside from the illustration of how valuable each and every one of the sheep are to their Shepherd, which is yet another illustration that all Israel shall indeed be saved....

Is the Constitution Christian?

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Pastor Mark Downey interviews Pastor Ken Lent on William Finck's Christogenea on Talkshoe
Internet radio program. Discussed were the claims by some anti-Constitution factions that the founding fathers were immoral deists undermining the Christian roots of early America.

The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 14

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The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 14 – Christogenea on Talkshoe, September 7th, 2012

1 And it happened while He entered into the house of one of the leaders of the Pharisees on the Sabbath to eat bread that they were watching Him closely.

The opponents of Christ had been watching to entrap Him since the “time if His coming forth”, as it says in Luke chapter 11, “laying in wait for Him to catch something from His mouth.

2 Then behold, there was a certain edematous man before Him.

The word ὑδρωπικός (5203) is an adjective, “dropsical” (Liddell & Scott), an “edematous man” here. From ὕδρωψ, “dropsy” (Liddell & Scott), the word is an archaic term for edema, “an excessive accumulation of serous fluid in tissue spaces or a body cavity” (The American Heritage College Dictionary), and derived from ὕδωρ “water”.

The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 13

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The Gospel of Luke, Chapters 13 – Christogenea on Talkshoe, August 31st, 2012

1 Then there were some present at that time who reported to Him concerning the Galilaians whose blood Pilate had mixed with their sacrifices. 2 And replying He said to them: “Do you suppose that those Galilaians had been wrongdoers beyond all the Galilaians, because they suffered these things? 3 No, I say to you, but if you do not repent, all of you likewise shall be destroyed!

Luke often took pains to make his accounts historically accurate, as for example in Luke chapter 3 where he lists those ruling over the various districts of Palestine at the time of the birth of Christ. Yet there is no other record outside of Luke of the event at the tower of Siloam seen mentioned in verse 4, and neither is there any other account of the destruction of these Galilaians which is mentioned here. Yet there were other similar events recorded by Josephus which described the many problems that occurred during the tenure of Pilate in Judaea, mostly due to the inevitable clash of Judaean and Roman cultures and the relatively new religion of the worship of the emperor which began to rise in the days of Augustus. However there seems to be a certain civil discord and unrest which is evident in history wherever a Canaanite-Edomite element takes a predominant role in society, as was evident in America during the 1960's and 70's. An example is in Josephus' Wars of the Judaeans, in Book 2, chapter 9, sections 2 through 4, as Whiston numbered his edition:

The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 12

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The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 12 – Christogenea on Talkshoe, August 24th, 2012

In the last two chapters of Luke we have seen Christ demonstrate that His opponents were of the race of Cain – because only Cain could be held responsible for the blood of Abel - and that the serpents of the time of Christ were indeed related to the long-ago fall of satan, the “angels” which had rebelled from God and had gone off into iniquity. The blood of the prophets is found in Mystery Babylon, for which see Revelation 18:24. This understanding agrees perfectly with the statements in John, in chapter 10 of his gospel where we see that the Judaeans opposing Christ were not of His sheep, and in chapter 8 of his gospel where we see that those opposed to Christ were of their “father, the devil”, who was a “murderer from the beginning”, and only Cain could be called a “murderer from the beginning”. With certainty, Cain was a devil for the same reason that the Edomite Judas Iscariot was a devil, because he too was of bastard seed. All of this also agrees with the first epistle of John, where it insists that Christians love one another, contrasting Cain where it says “12 Not as Kain who was from of the Wicked One and slaughtered his brother; and with delight he slaughtered him, because his deeds were evil, but those of his brother righteous.” Now there is no evidence that Cain was ever a student of the serpent, but there is plenty of evidence that Cain was the offspring of a serpent! The mystery of iniquity is genetic, and opposed to that is the first law of Yahweh our God, which is that of kind after kind.

The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 11

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The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 11 – Christogenea on Talkshoe, August 17th, 2012

1 And it came to pass, while He was in a certain place praying, as He had stopped, one of His students said to Him: “Prince, teach us to pray, just as Iohannes had also taught his students.” 2 So He said to them “When you pray, you say: ‘Father, Your Name must be sanctified. Your kingdom must come. 3 Give to us each day our daily bread. 4 And forgive us our errors, for we also forgive all those indebted to us. And do not bring us into trial’.”

The word ἐπιούσιος (1967) is defined by the 9th edition of the Liddell & Scott Greek-English Lexicon “either, sufficient for the coming (and so current) day... or, for the day” and aside from Matt. 6:11 and here, only very obscure references are given for the word, and they also explain that it was a “very rare word in Origen’s day”. The word surely seems to mean upon being and may have been written necessary, and so here as it is in the King James Version, it is simply daily.

The Codices Alexandrinus (A), Ephraemi Syri (C), Bezae (D), Washingtonensis (W), 070, and the Majority Text, and therefore the King James Version, all insert at the end of this verse: “...but deliver us from the evil one.” The text of the Christogenea New Testament, which does not include the clause, follows the third century papyrus P75, and the Codices Sinaiticus (א) and Vaticanus (B). The clause does appear in all of the early manuscripts of Matthew's version of the prayer, in Matthew 6:9-13.

The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 10

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The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 10 – Christogenea on Talkshoe, August 10th, 2012

This is the continuance of our presentation of the Gospel of Luke, which has been interrupted since we discussed chapter 9 on July 20th. In the closing of Luke chapter 9 we saw the account of the Transfiguration on the Mount, where Christ was said to have appeared and conferred with two men. Those two men were fully esteemed by the apostles who witnessed it to have been Moses and Elijah. Christians must know, that if Yahweh our God and our Creator does not transcend the physical world, and that if He has has no efficacy to act within His creation, and if there is not more to that creation than what we commonly perceive, including our own beings, then indeed we have no hope in the world and it is inevitable that evil shall prevail – for we as a race and as a society are currently headed straight for the pits of hell. In truth, there is more to the Creation than what we perceive, and there is more to our being than this short life of flesh. In the end, the Creator God shall not be mocked by the bastardization of His creation. Those of our Adamic race who love Him shall indeed overcome the world.

Following the Transfiguration, there is something that was not commented upon sufficiently when Luke chapter 9 was presented here several weeks ago. In verse 51 we see that Christ was resolved to go into Jerusalem, where it says “And it came to pass, with the fulfillment of the days of His being taken up, that He had set firm His countenance for which to go into Jerusalem.” We see immediately thereafter, that Christ having sent the apostles out into the various towns and villages along His route in order to announce His coming, that the people of the various villages of Samaria “did not receive Him, because His countenance was for going to Jerusalem.” This is not a testimony against the people of those villages. Rather, it is a testimony of the power of God in daily life. His purpose is fulfilled in the world regardless of the actions, intentions, or emotions of man.

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