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A Christogenea commentary On the Gospel of John is now in progress. Many passages simply do not say what the modern churches think they mean! Don't miss this important and ground-breaking work proving that Christian Identity is indeed fully supported by Scripture.

Don't miss our ongoing series of podcasts The Protocols of Satan, which presents many historical proofs that the infamous Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion are real, and that they have been fulfilled in history by the very same people who dispute their authenticity. Our companion series, The Jews in Medieval Europe, helps to explain how the Protocols have been fulfilled.

 Our recent Pragmatic Genesis series explains the Bible from a Christian Identity perspective which reconciles both Old and New Testaments with history and the political and social realities facing the Christian people of Yahweh God today.

A Commentary on the Epistles of Paul has recently been completed at Christogenea.org. This lengthy and in-depth series reveals the true Paul as an apostle of God, a prophet in his own right, and the first teacher of what we call Christian Identity.

Don't miss our recently-completed series of commentaries on the Minor Prophets of the Bible, which has also been used as a vehicle to prove the historicity of the Bible as well as the Provenance of God.

Visit Clifton Emahiser's Watchman's Teaching Ministries at Christogenea.org for his many foundational Christian Identity studies.

Visit the Mein Kampf Project at Christogenea.org and learn the truth concerning some of the most-lied about events in history.

Christogenea Books: Christian Truths in Black and White!
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Every Friday night at 8:PM Eastern. Hear Christian Identity explained from Scripture like you have never heard it before! Listen on Talkshoe or here on Christogenea streaming radio.

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Bible Basics - Part 1

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William Finck and Sven Longshanks of Radio Aryan discuss the historicity of Genesis, the Exodus, and some of the archaeological evidence which supports the truths of our Bibles. The true nature of the sacrifice of Abraham compared to similar acounts of human sacrifice in European literature, the ancient secular historical support for the Exodus account, a brief comparison of the Genesis account to the creation accounts of the surrounding nations, and more...

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Remembering Clifton Emahiser, Who is the Beast of the Field?

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Apologies for posting this late...

Remembering Clifton Emahiser, Who is the Beast of the Field?

Too many Identity Christians take for granted the claim that the non-White races are the so-called “beasts of the field”. While in some passages non-Whites may be described as beasts, the word beast in those instances being used as a pejorative, that does not mean that they are the “beasts of the field” or “beasts of the earth” of the Creation account in Genesis. Alan Campbell, Eli James and others have continually made that claim, but it simply is not true. Then, more nefariously, Eli James and his cronies would call them “men” in relation to the New Testament, which is a Jew trick if I ever saw one.

The truth is, that Peter called the non-Whites among us “natural brute beasts, made to be taken and destroyed,” and that is truly what they are, but none of the creatures created by Yahweh were made for that express purpose. In that same verse of his second epistle, Peter went on to say that they “shall utterly perish in their own corruption”, ostensibly because they came to exist through corruption.

Remembering Clifton Emahiser, Angels Chained in Darkness

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Remembering Clifton this evening, we replayed a program I presented with him on June 10th of 2011, The Angels Chained in Darkness

Tonight we are mourning the death of our long-time friend and fellow-worker, Clifton Emahiser, who passed on Wednesday afternoon. This introduction is prerecorded for both programs this weekend, July 20th and 21st, 2018, and each evening I will rebroadcast a program which Clifton and I did together over the past several years.

Clifton Emahiser had been very sick for a long time. He had a stent put in his heart in 1998. One can go to his very first Watchman’s Teaching Letter, published in May of 1998, and the first thing he discussed was his heart attack that February, and his promise to devote the rest of his life to a teaching ministry. I remember him telling me often, even while I was still in prison, which is now at least ten years ago, about his intermittent spells of high blood pressure or low pulse rates.

Last August he had fallen in his garage at home, spent 17 hours on the floor, and had suffered some minor heart attacks then. The type of heart attacks to which Clifton was susceptible were not the sudden, massive ones that usually kill men immediately, but more subtle, long-lasting ones that leave one too weak to do much of anything but to have anxiety. He was told last August that he had more blocked arteries, but because of his age he was not a candidate for heart surgery.

So we brought Clifton here to our home in Florida, and tried our best to make him as comfortable as possible. I tried to encourage him to keep working, but he was generally too weak and tired to find the energy for writing. Diet and supplements were not much help.

The Only True Adam of Genesis, Part 3: Adam's Commission

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The Only True Adam of Genesis, Part 3: Adam’s Commission

We have been presenting this series, The Only True Adam, not only because I have been too busy with necessary but worldly tasks here at home to maintain my regular schedule, but also because we are constantly confronted both on social media and within our own real-world circle of associates with long-time Christian Identity adherents who believe that there were two distinct creations of man, each of them called adam, in the Genesis account in our Bibles.

The title of this series, first used by Clifton Emahiser several years ago, is a challenge to those people, that there is one – and only one – creation of Adamic man described in Genesis. The word adam is a collective noun referring to a race of men, as it says in Genesis 5:2 where we read “Male and female created he them; and blessed them, and called their name Adam, in the day when they were created.” This is a clear reference to the day described in Genesis 1:26-27, and it uses identical language from that passage to describe that race. But the word adam can also be a proper noun, a name used to describe the first male of that race.

As we described in Part 2 of this series, which we understand was quite prosaic and perhaps tedious to follow along with in a podcast, the proponents of this so-called 6th & 8th Day creation theory insist that the adam of Genesis 1:26 is a distinct being from the eth-ha-adam of Genesis 2:7, and the first thing they ignore is that the adam of Genesis 1:26 in the Hebrew is called eth-ha-adam in Genesis 1:27! Then, among other things, we went on to explain that these differences are only grammatical, and other forms, such as ha-adam, al-ha-adam, el-ha-adam and vav-lamedh-adam appear in these same chapters of Scripture. So if one insists that there are two different Adamic creations in Genesis chapters 1 & 2, for reasons of grammar, then one better insist that there were really five or six different Adamic creations in Genesis, for that same reason. But if one insists that there are two different Adamic creations in Genesis chapters 1 & 2 for reasons related to the general narrative, then one must insist that there were three different Adamic creations once Genesis chapter 5 is encountered.

On the Gospel of John, Part 6: The Wedding Feast at Cana

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On the Gospel of John, Part 6: The Wedding Feast at Cana

In John chapter 1 the apostle had made many bold statements proclaiming the deity of Jesus, or Yahshua Christ. The assertions that He is the Word made Flesh, the Light of the World, the Lamb of God, and the declaration of the purpose of the ministry of John the Baptist all assert that Yahshua Christ is indeed Yahweh God incarnate. He is THE Son of God because He is the manifestation of God Himself, as it was promised in the Psalms and the prophets. This is better understood once the many passages from the Old Testament which also refer to these things are examined and considered, even if they were not all explicitly cited by John himself. The New Testament cannot be properly understood outside of the context provided by the Old Testament, and we sought to elucidate many of those passages as we presented John chapter 1 over the first five parts of this series.

The gospels of Luke and Matthew open with accounts of certain events from the birth and early life of Christ. But in the third chapter of each of those gospels there is the testimony of John the Baptist. The gospel of Mark, similar to that of John, says nothing of the birth or early years in the life of Christ, and opens with the testimony of John the Baptist. So the testimony of John is the event by which all four gospels open their descriptions of the beginning of the ministry of Christ. Doing so, all four gospels cite Isaiah 40:3, attributing the words to John as they are spoken in reference to Christ, where it describes “3 The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the LORD, make straight in the desert a highway for our God,” and explains that John the Baptist was that voice. If John was that voice, then Yahshua Christ must be Yahweh incarnate, the God for whom he prepared the way.

Mark, in that first chapter, also cited Malachi 3:1 in reference to John the Baptist, where it says “Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me: and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts.” Yahshua Christ Himself had later cited this also, in reference to John, as it is recorded in Matthew chapter 11 and Luke chapter 7. Both of these passages, from Malachi and from Isaiah, are prophecies of John the Baptist and of Yahshua Christ, and if John was the messenger to prepare the way before the Lord (Hebrew, adon) who would come to His temple, then Yahshua Christ is Yahweh Himself, who came to His temple in fulfillment of that prophecy. Once again, if we believe the testimony of Isaiah and Malachi, then Yahshua must be God incarnate.

The Only True Adam of Genesis Chapters 1 and 2

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The Only True Adam of Genesis Chapters 1 and 2

This evening I am going to present a pair of short essays from Clifton Emahiser, which were originally titled The Only True Adam of Genesis 1:26-27 & 2:7, parts 1 and 2. Some of the comments and data that I may add to these articles as we proceed, I have already discussed at length in various podcasts and articles at Christogenea, but especially in Part 1 of my own Pragmatic Genesis series. Clifton himself has another article on this topic, which he had written some time later, titled "Adam" in the Hebrew in Genesis, and in that initial segment of Pragamatic Genesis I expanded on that article.

I am not going to get into much depth on Hebrew grammar this evening, which is the main topic of Clifton’s other paper and that first part of Pragmatic Genesis. But here I will only say that adding a preposition or a definite article to a noun does not by itself make that noun represent something different from what it represents without the preposition or article. The people who push the idea of two distinct Adamic creations attempt to do just that, and by it they display their own ignorance.

This evening I am making this particular presentation for two reasons. First, because we are traveling this week to the National Conference of the League of the South, and secondly, because even to this day there are certain so-called pastors in Christian Identity who cling to this fallacy of an 8th-Day Creation, and have the nerve to ridicule us for refuting it. One of them will also be at this conference. They do not even bother to offer a discussion, and they really do not know what they are ridiculing. In the end, it is they who shall be ridiculed.

The Road to Here

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The Road to Here. A chat with some friends, Ferlin, Doug, Sonny and Brett, how they came to Christian Identity, their influences and some of the opinions they formed along the way.

We thank them for their edification and encouragement.

 

On the Gospel of John, Part 5: The Focus of the Disciple

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We apologize to the live listeners who did not hear the last 8 minutes of this podcast. Our streaming computer, which has been quite reliable these past few years, suddenly cut off and Windows 10 began updating itself. This behavior is, of course, contrary to the settings which are supposed to preclude it from doing that during a live program.

On the Gospel of John, Part 5: The Focus of the Disciple

All four of our Christian gospels are written in a very simple and forthright manner, and they describe very little outside of the interactions of Yahshua Christ with His disciples and the people who He had encountered directly, along with some of His teachings and the miracles which He had done, and, of course, His final clash with the authorities. While sometimes they mention a few significant historical figures or events which relate to the birth and life of Christ or the beginning of His ministry, little is described of the world outside of the immediate Gospel narrative. So there are no deep explanations or descriptions of history or current events, nor is there much concern for the political, economic or social conditions in Judaea or the greater part of the Roman empire.

The disciples of Christ are focused upon Yahweh their God and their own immediate circumstances, putting their trust in God, and evidently they did not care if the king was bombing Syria, or invading Arabia. Now, that may seem like a sarcastic allusion to today’s circumstances, and it certainly is, but there were similar things happening at the time of John the Baptist, and the writers of the gospels and the portrayals of the characters involved in the ministry of Christ had no concern for them at all.

Before continuing, we must have a digression. Herod the Tetrarch, or Herod Antipas, appears often in all of the gospel accounts of the ministry of Christ. He is a son of the first Herod known from Matthew chapter 2 at the birth of Christ. He is also mentioned in Luke 3:1 as “tetrarch of Galilee”, where we also find another Herod, called Philip, who is called the tetrarch “of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis”. Herod Agrippa I is the Herod of Acts chapter 12. His son Herod Agrippa II is the Agrippa of Acts chapters 25 and 26, and the Bernice mentioned there is the younger Agrippa’s sister, and she is also alleged to have been his wife. The elder Herod Agrippa’s sister is the Herodias of the accounts of the slaying of John the Baptist in the synoptic gospels, and the Herod mentioned there is Herod Antipas. Herod Antipas and Herod Philip were half-brothers, and they had another half-brother, Artistobulus IV, who was the father of the elder Herod Agrippa. All three of the half-brothers had different mothers. Not all writers used the same names consistently for each Herod, so they are very difficult to follow through Scripture and history.

On the Gospel of John, Part 4: The Lamb of God

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On the Gospel of John, Part 4: The Lamb of God

Presenting Part 3 of this commentary on the Gospel of John, which was titled The Sons of God, we gave a full explanation of our translation of John 1:11-13, and we cannot sufficiently stress how important it is to understand the impact which one’s worldview can have upon one’s interpretation of Scripture. I also understand that these presentations may at times be very technical and hard to digest. However we must develop a scholarly basis for a proper understanding of the text before we can even begin to claim to understand the Bible. If one is persuaded by the commonly-accepted interpretations of the Jews concerning the ministry of Christ, then it is easy to accept the King James Version and other popular translations of these verses. So like a lamb being led to the slaughter, one may helplessly be led to believe that the universalist perspective of Scripture is true, and that all those who merely profess a belief in Jesus must therefore be accepted as having somehow become “sons of god” by a mere profession of their lips, and as if they could possibly even make that choice on their own.

However that position is actually in direct conflict with Scripture. Christ Himself had said, as it is recorded in Matthew chapter 7, that “21 Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven. 22 Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works? 23 And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity.” Likewise, the apostle James said that “19 Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble.” So we see that mere belief is not enough to somehow make one a child of God, even if it is a belief which is accompanied by “many wonderful works”. But if we believe that every word of God is true, and that the Scriptures do not conflict with themselves, then it is evident that these passages, along with many others found in the gospels, such as the parable of the tares of the field or the statement by Christ concerning plants which Yahweh did not plant, sufficiently indicate that the common interpretations of John 1:11-13 must be wrong.

On the Gospel of John, Part 3: The Sons of God

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On the Gospel of John, Part 3: The Sons of God

In the opening portions of this commentary on the Gospel of John, we hope to have sufficiently illustrated from Old Testament Scriptures, as well as from the Revelation and other sources, the meanings of the assertions that Yahshua Christ is the Word made Flesh and the Light come into the World, assertions by which the apostle had poetically and confidently attested that Yahshua Christ was indeed Yahweh God Himself, the God of the Old Testament incarnate as a man, and that He was the true Messenger to man sweeping aside all of the false claims of antiquity. So we saw that John, attesting that Christ is the light come into the world, had also made an assertion in reference to Christ which had formerly been claimed by the great kings of antiquity, those of the Hittites, Babylonians, Egyptians and others, who had made that same claim for themselves, even imagining for themselves to be the incarnation of the Sun on earth. Later, in John chapter 12, Christ Himself is recorded as having originated the assertions which John has made for Him here, as the event actually preceded the record.

Then coming to verse 10 of this first chapter of John, we contended with the King James translation of the passage, which reads “He was in the world, and the world was made by him, and the world knew him not.” The meaning of this passage clearly may have been different in the original understanding of the English of 1611, the word world now having a different meaning. Examining that word world, we came to the conclusion that the word would better be translated as society, since it does not refer to the entire planet and everything on it in the way that it is often interpreted today. There are passages in the classical Greek writings where the word appears in broad contexts and may be interpreted as universe, however that is not necessarily the manner in which it was used in the New Testament, and it was not always the manner in which the classical Greek writers had used the term...

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