Christogenea Internet Radio Podcast Archives

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Ecclesiastes, Part 5: Wisdom and the Power of Sin

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Ecclesiastes, Part 5: Wisdom and the Power of Sin

Presenting our commentary on Ecclesiastes chapter 6, we discussed the vanity of poverty and wealth. The Preacher had presented us with three examples of circumstances in the lives of men, and the evils that befall two of them. The first example was of the man who, having been blessed with riches, was blessed by Yahweh in his later years to enjoy the fruits of his life’s labors. Then there was the man who accumulated riches and was bereaved of them so that he lived his later years in want. Finally, there was the man who worked a long life and had many children, but who had never enjoyed any luxuries all of the time that he lived.

While it was apparent that the men of the latter two examples were undergoing trials imposed on them by Yahweh, whether or not they had sinned, it is also evident from other Scriptures that the man in the first example, the rich man who enjoyed his wealth, was also being tested. But this is not evident unless we examine the Law and the Gospel. In the Law we learn that wealth is given to men by Yahweh so that He may establish His covenant, in Deuteronomy chapter 8. Understanding that, wealthy men should abide the Gospel of Christ and employ their wealth in a manner so as to build His Kingdom, seeking to store treasure in heaven rather than to increase their earthly treasures even further. So this might be the most difficult of these three examples for a man to live up to.

Another End Times Update

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An End Times Update: William Finck surveys the prospects for the anticipated Fall of Babylon, review some of the relevant Scriptures, and discuss the changes in circumstances and attitudes on the political, economic and social landscape in America since the topic was covered in depth here in the Beginnings and Ends series last June.

Read more for the images of the "family" I discussed during the latter portion of the podcast.

Ecclesiastes, Part 4: The Vanity of Both Wealth and Poverty

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Ecclesiastes, Part 4: The Vanity of Both Wealth and Poverty

Resuming our presentation of Solomon’s Ecclesiastes here with chapter 6, as we have already explained, there are going to be times when we shall necessarily repeat ourselves, because the work itself is quite repetitive in nature. But we have also explained that as he repeats his themes, the Preacher adds different perspectives or new elements to his subjects. With this we have concluded that the repetitious nature of the work is one of its teaching methods, just as the skepticism which is often expressed is also a teaching method. Making repetitive remarks, the author expresses and addresses skeptical concerns in different ways.

The labors of life, the vanity of those labors, the trials which man must undergo only to die in the end empty-handed. And regardless of whether he had been impoverished or wealthy, the oppressed or an oppressor, his fate is the same as all other men, and with this he has no comforter. That was the theme which the Preacher had employed in chapter 4 of Ecclesiastes, that man has no comforter to succour him in his trials, while all of his own labors are vanity. However the antithesis to the skepticism and the dismal outlook of the Preacher is found in Christ, since He is the Comforter of men, as He described Himself, as it is recorded in John chapter 14, and as Paul had also described Christ in the opening passage of his second epistle to the Corinthians. Ultimately, the Preacher will answer his own skepticism in this same manner, that all things are in the hand of God and that He shall judge every good or evil work. But he does not make that conclusion explicit until the very last chapter of the work.

Another Discussion with Dr. Michael Hill of the League of the South

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William Finck speaks with Dr. Michael Hill about the League's experiences throughout the past 12 months, and the League's plans for the coming year. Reflected upon were the events in New Orleans, Charlottesville, Shelbyville and elsewhere, a discussion on League optics, partnerships in the Nationalist Front, the value of the Alt-Right, and more.

After the interview, Finck offers a 30-minute discussion explaining why Jesus Christ is not a Jew. He certainly is not, regardless of what the world thinks. This is the true and great lie which must be addressed today.

A Critical Review of Bertrand Comparet’s Christianity Discriminates and We Face the Future

 

A Critical Review of Bertrand Comparet’s Christianity Discriminates and We Face the Future

The subtitle to this presentation should be: What should Christians be doing now?

We received a brief email the other day from someone who had recently joined the Christogenea Forum and it read, with a few small corrections: “This is supposed to be a Christian forum website but every thread I have come across has nothing but the words bastards, niggers and spics all over the conversations. Was God or Jesus racist? In this case, what would Jesus do? I am reporting this website.” Now, we don’t know why this person decided to join our Forum before realizing that we were not the usual run-of-the-mill worldly sort of lukewarm Christian group one may see in the denominational church organizations. However this post is exemplary of the lack of discrimination in our society, and we perceive that lack as a negative quality. This message also reflects the attitude of someone who confuses the Internet with those quasi-public websites like Facebook or Twitter, where you can simply report everything you don’t like and make it go away. But in fact, Yahweh our God is a racist, He does discriminate, and He is not going to go away.

This evening, as we travel to Tallahassee to participate in some activities with the League of the South later this weekend, we are going to present two short sermons from Bertrand Comparet, entitled Christianity Discriminates, and We Face the Future. The versions we have here were typeset and edited by Clifton Emahiser, perhaps twelve or fourteen years ago. Some of Comparet’s remarks may seem dated, as the Satanic plans of world Jewry have far advanced against Christendom since he presented these sermons in the 1960’s and 70’s, however the Biblical perspectives are timeless. We shall endeavor to augment them wherever we can.

Exactly Why Jesus Christ is NOT a Jew

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This recording has been appended to the Christogenea Saturdays program for January 27th, 2018. It merits this serparate posting.

What if Jesus were descended from the Israelite tribe of Judah, as the Scripture says that He is? Well, of course He is, because the Scriptures do not lie. But what if the people known as Jews today were NOT of the tribe of Judah? Nor even of Benjamin or Levi? Then how could Jesus possibly be a Jew? The answer is easy, Jesus is not a Jew because the people known as Jews today are not of Judah. The Bible itself tells us this.

For this reason Jesus Himself told the church at Smyrna, in Revelation 2:9: "I know thy works, and tribulation, and poverty, (but thou art rich) and I know the blasphemy of them which say they are Jews, and are not, but are the synagogue of Satan."

Just in case that is not understood, Jesus also said to the church at Philadelphia, in Revelation 3:9: "Behold, I will make them of the synagogue of Satan, which say they are Jews, and are not, but do lie; behold, I will make them to come and worship before thy feet, and to know that I have loved thee."

So according to Jesus Himself, the people calling themselves Jews at this time are not "real" Jews, meaning that they are not actually of the tribe of Judah. But how can that be? First, we will see that Paul of Tarsus agrees with Jesus, and the events which Luke recorded in Acts chapter 26 had actually transpired about 35 years before John recorded the Revelation.

The Phony No-Satan Dogma, Part 2, with Clifton Emahiser

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Clifton Emahiser joins William Finck to discuss a series of essays addressing those who would claim that there is no such an entity as Satan. 

Clifton's original series, found at his website, was written in late 2006 and through 2007.

Ecclesiastes, Part 3: The Comforter

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Ecclesiastes, Part 3: The Comforter

Proceeding through our presentation of Solomon’s Ecclesiastes, it is evident that there are going to be times when we shall be compelled to repeat ourselves, because the work itself is quite repetitive in nature. We have also discussed, as our writer himself had explained, why we believe that this preacher is indeed Solomon, the ancient king of Israel. But we have called him the Preacher because that is what he had called himself as he wrote this work. As he repeats his themes, the Preacher also uses different perspectives or adds new elements to his subjects. Therefore we can see that the repetition of the work is one of its teaching methods, just as the skepticism that the Preacher often expressed is also a teaching method. Making his repetitive remarks, the Preacher expresses and addresses skeptical concerns in different ways throughout this work.

The transience, or vanity, of man, the cyclical nature of worldly existence, the fact that man ultimately dies without any apparent reward for his labors, or any ability to enjoy them once he is gone and therefore he must leave them to the enjoyment of others, these have been the primary subjects of the Preacher. And even though he laments such vanity, where he exhorts men to keep the commandments of God we realize that while all may appear to be vanity, all is vanity without God. Therefore with God, it becomes evident that all is not in vain, that there must be something greater in the end, some greater purpose underlying man’s apparent vanity. Realizing this, we must admit that for man, for the Adamic man which Yahweh created to be immortal, the skepticism of the Preacher is unwarranted because there certainly is a God.

In chapter 3 of Ecclesiastes the Preacher added to his lamentation over the vanity of man the idea that men were no different than the beasts, who also labored and died. However there the Preacher had also asserted that it was God who purposely subjected man to vanity, and that man should therefore fear God, because “God requires that which is past” and “God shall judge the righteous and the wicked: for there is a time there for every purpose and for every work.” Considering this, we must conclude that man’s labors do indeed matter in the end, that man will be judged for his works, however it is also apparent that man will be judged for the works of his life apart from and beyond whatever worldly riches he was able to accumulate during that life. Later on, in the Gospel, Christ taught the same difference between the accumulation of worldly riches, and the accumulation of treasure in heaven by the good things that a man may do in this life.

The Protocols of Satan, Part 34: Above the Law

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The Protocols of Satan, Part 34: Above the Law

In the last installment of these Protocols of Satan, we discussed the legal concept by which corporations are somehow perceived as artificial persons, and are therefore granted all of the rights and privileges of actual citizens. But in reality, when they do wrong they face none of the actual burdens of the penalties which real persons face. Then we attempted to demonstrate the hypocrisy of this, and show that there are indeed counter-arguments that corporations are not persons at all, and that there is no actual body of legal justification which has ever explained how corporations are persons. This we did citing articles by several lawyers and law students. As a digression, in reality the debate does not matter, because as so-called legal scholars argue over the centuries, corporations purchase the outcome of election after election, using their comparatively vast wealth to nominate the candidates of all parties so that they can never really lose the political debate.

This all leads to another concept which we began to explore: the fact that there is no substantial basis in our legal systems by which corporations are justly punished for any crimes which they commit. So we gave some historic background on early corporate America, where we hoped to show that the concept of a corporation is relatively new in history, and mostly developed as this young nation developed. So in reality, a corporation is also a product of Liberalism – and those of us who understand the real forces behind the development of Liberalism should also understand that the same dark forces have always been behind the concept of the corporation in the reality of the modern system of capitalism.

Doing that, we also explained the concept of limited liability and how the owners of a corporation can never be held liable for damages beyond the value of their original investments, no matter how much damage their corporation may do to others. Then we presented some data showing that as early corporations developed, not only were their owners separated from any real liability for potential wrongdoing, but as the corporations themselves developed, ownership and typical corporate management also became isolated one from another. So the average citizen who owns stock in a corporation has no say in its operation, where corporate managers have become a class unto themselves.

Ecclesiastes, Part 2: Vanity and Deliverance

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Ecclesiastes, Part 2: Vanity and Deliverance

Presenting the opening chapters of Ecclesiastes, we showed how this work was attributed to King Solomon from the earliest times, and also how it accords very well with the life of Solomon, once we realize that it must have been written in the later part of his life. Only in the life of Solomon do we find someone who could have had the experiences of this writer, who called himself the Preacher but who also claimed to be a son of David and king over all Israel. Then in addition to these assertions, there is also the confession of an abundantly opulent lifestyle which the historical Scriptures describe for us in the life of Solomon. Writing this book, the Preacher is now reflecting back on that life and assessing its value.

Ecclesiastes was written to lament the plight of man, that none of the works of man seem to be of any benefit to him at the end of his life, because he must leave the fruits of them to others. Realizing this, the Preacher turned to mirth and decadence, but neither did he find any satisfaction in those things. Making our own assessment of his words, we explained that the Preacher had purposely employed skepticism as a teaching method throughout his discourse. All is vanity, he proclaimed, but what he really meant to say is that all is vanity without God, something which is further revealed to us as we make our way through these subsequent chapters of his work.

Ecclesiastes is poorly understood by many Bible readers, since the skepticism it expresses is often mistaken for Scriptural truth. But rather, that skepticism is merely used as a literary device in order to demonstrate that without God, man has no hope at all. Regardless of what he does with his life, in the end he dies like all other men, and all are eventually forgotten. Reading the book, Christians should understand that the conclusions of the skeptic are wrong, because there is a God. The Preacher makes that expression where he declares the importance of keeping the Law. Here in this chapter, chapter 3 of Ecclesiastes, the Preacher informs us that it is God who subjected man to this travail, for man to be exercised in vanity. If man is being purposely exercised in vanity, then there must be something for him beyond this life, or the exercise itself would be in vain. Here we must ask, does even God act in vain?

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