Christogenea Saturdays


Christogenea is reader supported. If you find value in our work, please help to keep it going! See our Contact Page for more information.


Every Saturday night at 8:PM Eastern.

CHRISTOGENEA Saturdays on Talkshoe at 8:00 PM Eastern

 

TalkShoe

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 21: Weisman’s Smear Tactics

ChrSat20200704Weisman21.mp3 — Downloaded 924 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 21: Weisman’s Smear Tactics

Earlier in our review of his book, discussing his comments on page 23, we showed how statements by Weisman revealed that he himself did not believe that either Christ or His apostles had represented truth, as well as some of the later prophets, such as Zechariah. That was where he said that “The concept of a second god which caused evil in the world was primarily formed during the Exile (585-515 B.C.), being the result of Babylonian and Zoroastrian influence.” His statements in support of that claim ignored references to Satan, demons and devils which are found throughout the Old Testament, and then claimed that such passages in the New Testament are mistranslated or misinterpreted. Then further claiming that the serpent was “nullified by Christ”, he denied many statements of the apostles and of Christ Himself in His Revelation. So it became apparent that Weisman is not even a Christian.

Now here in this chapter, Weisman corroborated that conclusion once again, where he compared the labeling of certain people as serpents, devils and vipers in the New Testament to examples of the often unrighteous demonization of men throughout history, and said that “Since the Jews have long been the self-sworn enemy of Christendom, they have been portrayed by many Christians throughout history as being of a devilish origin. It is a small step, then, to make them out to be the literal descendants of the devil or satan.” Doing that, Weisman unabashedly demoted Yahshua Christ to the level of a common slanderer, rather than recognizing that God Incarnate was bringing the light of Truth to men. So once again, Weisman proved to us that he is no Christian.

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 20: Witches, Warlocks and Weisman

ChrSat20200627Weisman20.mp3 — Downloaded 1340 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 20: Witches, Warlocks and Weisman

Over the past 19 parts of this series addressing Charles Weisman’s book What About the Seedline Doctrine?, discussing his first four chapters of his book, we hope to have fully established the truths of our Seedline profession, and the fact that Charles Weisman misrepresented many things, and even made many outright lies, in order to attempt to refute those truths. Now we will continue to present the rest of Weisman’s book, as he wrongly believes that he has refuted our position and now he attempts to slander it, evidently hoping to forever discredit our doctrines. As we undertake this endeavor, we will try to avoid repeating much of the basis for our beliefs here, as we have already elaborated greatly on all of the basic reasons for believing in what is usually called Two-Seedline. But so that we can defend against his charges here, we may have to repeat some things we believe, and will try to do so without too much elaboration.

Here Weisman attempts to slander our Seedline doctrine by associating it with witchcraft, Gnosticism, Freemasonry, the Talmud, the rabbis of Judaism, and ultimately, the Kabbalah. But even this order of his own illustrations is deceptive, as we have demonstrated in our series on The Jews in Medieval Europe that Freemasonry was in large part founded on the Kabbalah, but the Kabbalah was not written until the 12th century, or perhaps the 13th, by a Jew in Spain. Of course, much of it was based on older systems, namely the Talmud and Medieval Neoplatonism, but the work has no authentic ancient authority. In turn, the Kabbalah is the link to witchcraft and alchemy in Medieval Europe, and in the time of John Dee the alchemists, who were all practitioners of Kabbalah, became Speculative Masons, and ultimately were admitted into the guilds of the Freemasons, whereafter Masonry became a tool in the hands of the Jewish Kabbalists by which to inculcate Christians into Jewish teachings and the accomplishment of Jewish objectives.

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 19: Vagabonds, Wanderers and Weisman

ChrSat20200620Weisman19.mp3 — Downloaded 1483 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 19: Vagabonds, Wanderers and Weisman

Here we shall finally finish our presentation and discussion of Chapter 4 of Charles Weisman’s book, What About the Seedline Doctrine?, which he had titled The Role of Cain. Doing this, we shall attempt to summarize many of the things we found throughout our discussions, as Weisman consistently misread passages, purposely ignored the context of passages, twisting and even lying about Scripture in his attempts to deny the veracity of Two-Seedline. With our investigation of this one chapter having begun in part 9 of this series, we hope to have refuted Weisman comprehensively.

In our last presentation, we had left off where Weisman mischaracterized the relationship of Kenites with Israel at the time of king Saul, where he said “The Kenites were friendly to the Israelites.” There we had shown that from the time that Balaam prophesied about the Kenites in Numbers chapter 24, to the time of Saul, a period of nearly 450 years, there is only one mention of a single Kenite, and that referred to Heber, who was a Midianite smith in the days of Deborah and Barak, perhaps 400 years before the time of Saul. The Kenites not being mentioned again until for some unknown reason Saul had warned them to depart from Amalek, we see that Weisman had no basis for that statement. This is representative of the poor interpretations of Scripture offered by Weisman throughout this book.

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 18: The Children of Cain

ChrSat20200613Weisman18.mp3 — Downloaded 1443 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 18: The Children of Cain

Here once again we shall continue with our series of presentations Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine?, and this is part 18 of our endeavor. We believe that all along the way, through each of the first 17 parts of this series, we have shown that Charles Weisman depended upon an ignorance of history – purposeful or not – coupled with many misinterpretations of passages, seemingly intentional misreadings of passages, and even outright lies, in order to convince his readers that Two-Seedline teachings are in error.

We last left off with Charles Weisman’s claim that the serpent of Eden was the first murderer, the “murderer from the beginning” mentioned by Christ in John 8:44. Making that claim, Weisman evidently hoped to decouple interpretations of Matthew 24:34-35 from John 8:44, which together, along with an understanding of the history of Judaea over the decades leading up to the ministry of Christ certainly do prove that He was indeed speaking to descendants of Cain. We have shown conclusively that within the Biblical context, the serpent of Eden could not have been the first murderer, and that Cain alone was the first murderer.

This is also plainly evident in the words of the apostle John. In 1 John chapter 3, speaking within the context of Cain’s having killed Abel, John wrote “15 Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer: and ye know that no murderer hath eternal life abiding in him.” Cain and Abel were John‘s example by which to set the context for that statement, and therefore Cain was the first murderer. In that same place that John informs us that Cain was “of that wicked one”, we see that Cain was the first murderer, as the serpent certainly was not Adam’s brother, and certainly did not bring death into the world by causing Adam to sin. As we also explained, Adam was punished for hearkening to the voice of his wife, not the voice of the serpent. Adam was not deceived, and therefore he alone was responsible for his sin.

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 17, The First Murderer

ChrSat20200606Weisman17.mp3 — Downloaded 1619 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 17, The First Murderer

We have tarried with Charles Weisman’s prolonged disputations revolving around John 8:44 and Matthew 23:34-35 for several of these presentations, and we are still not through all of Weisman’s arguments in relation to these passages. Some of those arguments revolve around the question of who killed the prophets in the Old Testament. In that passage from Matthew chapter 23, Yahshua Christ declared that the blood of all the prophets from Abel to Zacharias will come upon a particular race. We would assert that according to the laws of God, that race must be guilty for the crimes for which it is going to be punished, or if the charge is false, then according to the law the individual making the charge must suffer the penalty. We cannot imagine that Christ our God was making false charges or acting contrary to His law.

In the actions of men and nations, there is collective guilt, and there is individual guilt. When one nation wars against another, the men who actually do the shooting are compelled by their rulers, and generally not motivated to commit murder on their own volition. If the war were unjust, the rulers would be guilty individually, although the nation which did their bidding would share collective guilt. Therefore Peter, in Acts chapter 2 addressing men of Judaea in reference to Christ had said “23 Him, being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain”. The wicked hands were not those of the Romans, but the Jews, those who stood in the Praetorium demanding of Pilate that He be crucified, leaving him no other alternative. But the nation as a whole shared a collective guilt for the deed as they had suffered (tolerated) wicked rulers.

In 1 Kings chapter 18 we read: “4 For it was so, when Jezebel cut off the prophets of the LORD, that Obadiah took an hundred prophets, and hid them by fifty in a cave, and fed them with bread and water.” So we see individual guilt for the murder of those prophets had been placed upon Jezebel. But then we read in a prayer of Elijah in 1 Kings chapter 19: “14… I have been very jealous for the LORD God of hosts: because the children of Israel have forsaken thy covenant, thrown down thine altars, and slain thy prophets with the sword; and I, even I only, am left; and they seek my life, to take it away.” There we have a profession of collective guilt on the children of Israel for what Jezebel was primarily guilty of as an individual.

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 16, The Blessed and the Cursed

ChrSat20200530Weisman16.mp3 — Downloaded 1461 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 16, The Blessed and the Cursed

In our last presentation in this series, which was subtitled The Blood of Abel, we left off where Charles Weisman discussed the episode in Matthew chapter 23 where Christ had told His adversaries that their race would be held accountable for the blood of all the prophets, from Abel to Zacharias, which, discounting the interpolation in verse 35 we believe refers to the father of John the Baptist. We do not believe that it referred to the Old Testament prophet Zechariah as Christ had laid direct blame for the murder of this Zacharias on his adversaries, and not merely on their ancestors, where He said “whom ye slew between the temple and the altar.” Here we will continue that discussion of Cain and those who are responsible for the death of Abel and the prophets, as we are not finished with the portion of this fourth chapter of Weisman’s book which concerns that subject.

Speaking of Abel, in Hebrews chapter 11 Paul of Tarsus had written: “4 By faith Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain, by which he obtained witness that he was righteous, God testifying of his gifts: and by it he being dead yet speaketh.” We have already discussed at length the sacrifices of Cain and Abel, and provided Scriptures supporting the plausibility of our argument that the only reason Cain’s sacrifice was rejected is that Yahweh would not acknowledge Cain himself, Cain not even having been eligible to make such a sacrifice. But the only reason that Abel’s sacrifice was better lies in the mere fact that Abel was even making a sacrifice, by which he had asserted that he was indeed the eligible son.

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 15, The Blood of Abel

ChrSat20200523Weisman15.mp3 — Downloaded 1445 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 15, The Blood of Abel

Here we shall once again continue with our rebuttal to Charles Weisman’s book, What About the Seedline Doctrine?, and we are still in the middle of Chapter 4, which is titled The Role of Cain. Our last presentation in this series brought us to the middle of page 35, and we have tarried quite awhile addressing his arguments under the subtitle Of Your Father the Devil. Doing this, so far we hope to have made it fully evident that Charles Weisman is guilty of three primary and crucial mistakes in his method of interpreting the Scriptures.

First, he has consistently misread verses, and especially important verses such as Genesis 6:4, John 8:44 and Matthew 12:34, where in each instance he had failed to realize what the passage actually means, and based his arguments on his own poor, or perhaps purposefully wrong interpretations. Secondly, making those interpretations he also twisted the meanings of the plain words of Scripture in the same manner as the Gnostics and universalists who have for ages insisted that father does not mean a literal ancestor, or that children are not literal offspring in Scripture. Yet when we examined the passages of Scripture which he himself had used as examples, we showed that the literal meanings of the words make perfect sense once they are understood in the actual historical context of Scripture, and in the context of the words of the prophets. Thirdly, Weisman himself has thus far refused to even consider the historical context of the New Testament, an understanding of which clearly refutes his own insistence, made without any supporting evidence, that all of the adversaries of Christ were Israelites. We have proven from the pages of Josephus as well as from the epistles of Paul and the words of Christ Himself that Weisman is wrong in making that insistence.

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 14, The Bad Figs

ChrSat20200516Weisman14.mp3 — Downloaded 1714 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 14, The Bad Figs

Over our last two presentations in this series we have covered perhaps only two pages of Charles Weisman’s book, What About the Seedline Doctrine?, and have had a few long digressions. But we hope to have shown that in relation to many words found in the New Testament, Weisman had used the same methods of interpretation which had crept into the early universalist church, which were adopted from Gnosticism and Greek Philosophy, but which are not at all Christian.

So last week, in Part 13 of this series, subtitled Children of Wrath, we addressed a claim by Weisman that where Christ referred to His adversaries as children of the devil, He was only speaking metaphorically and telling them that they were mere followers of the devil. Making that argument, the first flaw is that he seems to have purposely ignored the fact that Christ was speaking in reference to Cain, and not to the serpent of Genesis. So if Christ was implying that His adversaries were mere followers of the devil, why would He make a reference to Cain as their father, and not to the serpent itself?

So while he made that assertion, Weisman then sought to show that being “children of the devil” was only a metaphor by comparing the phrase to similar metaphors which appear in the epistles of Paul or in the gospel accounts. Among these are the phrases children of wrath, children of light, children of the world, child of hell, children of disobedience and son of perdition. So we began to examine each instance that Weisman had cited, and a few that he did not cite, where these and similar phrases appear. Doing that, we found that these phrases certainly were used by the writers of Scripture to describe a class of people other than the children of God, a class which has no offer of mercy, forgiveness or redemption, nor any part in the promises of God. Weisman failed to examine those phrases in their original Biblical contexts, and therefore he expected his readers to take for granted his implication that they are all just metaphors describing people who are merely disobedient, rather than people who in fact could never really be obedient in the first place because they are literally not of God.

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 13, Children of Wrath

ChrSat20200509Weisman13.mp3 — Downloaded 1689 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 13, Children of Wrath

In our last presentation addressing Charles Weisman’s book What About the Seedline Doctrine?, we began to answer his contention where he said that “The Jews… that Jesus was talking to in John 8 were true Israelites. They were not hybrids like those called ‘Jews’ today, and they were not the seed of the serpent or of Cain.” Later in this fourth chapter of his book, Weisman states, speaking of the words of Christ, that “Words may be spoken figuratively, symbolically, allegorically, poetically, typically, or anti-typically.” But he fails to mention anything of understanding words in their original historical context, which is an important aspect of understanding any real-life narrative or discussion from the past. None of the Judeo-Christian commentaries upon which Weisman has relied, as his citations throughout this book indicate, had ever interpreted the words of Christ or his apostles through the proper historical context of the captivities of Israel, the relatively small remnant which returned to Judea, and the history of that remnant over the 450-year period from the time of Ezra to the birth of Christ. Weisman, as well as the mainstream commentators, all take it for granted that the people of Judaea at the time of Christ were all Israelites, and that is certainly not true.

In his voluminous Antiquities of the Judaeans, in Book 13, Flavius Josephus described in detail how the high priest John Hyrcanus, around 129 BC, had conquered several of the cities of Palestine which had formerly belonged to Israel and Judah, but which were occupied by the Edomites since the 6th century BC. In that same book, Josephus later described how in the days of Alexander Jannaeus, a successor of Hyrcanus, he had done that same thing in 30 other towns or regions in Palestine, during his long rule as high priest in Jerusalem, from 103 to 76 BC. Both of these rulers had forcibly converted the Edomites whom they had conquered to Judaism, the Edomites accepted the conversion, and that is also explained by Josephus. These passages are cited and described in detail at Christogenea, notably in Part 12 of the commentary on Romans: The Epistles of Paul - Romans Part 12, 06-27-2014: Jacob and Esau.

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 11, Gnostic Heresies

ChrSat20200425Weisman11.mp3 — Downloaded 1722 times

 

Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine? Part 11, Gnostic Heresies

In our last discussion Addressing Charles Weisman’s What About the Seedline Doctrine?, which was Part 10 of this series, we discussed the The Nature of Cain, and how it is that when he was challenged by God to do good, but then immediately went out and killed his brother, that also serves to prove the circumstances of his birth, that he could not do good because “sin lieth at the door”. We also discussed how and why both Cain and Abel were making sacrifices in the first place, since Cain’s rejected sacrifice was the catalyst for his having been challenged, and having killed Abel. Weisman imagined that Yahweh was offering Cain acceptance, but that is not the case at all. Yahweh, being God, certainly knew that Cain was going to fail. His challenge to Cain and Cain’s failure are not an exercise in vanity on the part of God, but rather they serve as a lesson to us, that a bastard will always do evil in the end. The fact that Abel was even making a sacrifice to Yahweh after Cain had done so also serves to illustrate the reasons for Cain’s disqualification, once it is examined within the context of later Scriptures and statements made by the apostles concerning the patriarchs Enoch and Noah. By the act of making a sacrifice Abel was asserting his own claim as rightful successor to his father.

Pages