Christogenea Internet Radio Podcast Archives

A Christogenea commentary On the Gospel of John is now in progress. Many passages simply do not say what the modern churches think they mean! Don't miss this important and ground-breaking work proving that Christian Identity is indeed fully supported by Scripture.

Don't miss our ongoing series of podcasts The Protocols of Satan, which presents many historical proofs that the infamous Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion are real, and that they have been fulfilled in history by the very same people who dispute their authenticity. Our companion series, The Jews in Medieval Europe, helps to explain how the Protocols have been fulfilled.

 Our recent Pragmatic Genesis series explains the Bible from a Christian Identity perspective which reconciles both Old and New Testaments with history and the political and social realities facing the Christian people of Yahweh God today.

A Commentary on the Epistles of Paul has recently been completed at Christogenea.org. This lengthy and in-depth series reveals the true Paul as an apostle of God, a prophet in his own right, and the first teacher of what we call Christian Identity.

Don't miss our recently-completed series of commentaries on the Minor Prophets of the Bible, which has also been used as a vehicle to prove the historicity of the Bible as well as the Provenance of God.

Visit Clifton Emahiser's Watchman's Teaching Ministries at Christogenea.org for his many foundational Christian Identity studies.

Visit the Mein Kampf Project at Christogenea.org and learn the truth concerning some of the most-lied about events in history.

Christogenea Books: Christian Truths in Black and White!
Visit our store at Christogenea.com.

Click here for a simplified listing of titles and links.

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On the Gospel of John, Part 5: The Focus of the Disciple

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We apologize to the live listeners who did not hear the last 8 minutes of this podcast. Our streaming computer, which has been quite reliable these past few years, suddenly cut off and Windows 10 began updating itself. This behavior is, of course, contrary to the settings which are supposed to preclude it from doing that during a live program.

On the Gospel of John, Part 5: The Focus of the Disciple

All four of our Christian gospels are written in a very simple and forthright manner, and they describe very little outside of the interactions of Yahshua Christ with His disciples and the people who He had encountered directly, along with some of His teachings and the miracles which He had done, and, of course, His final clash with the authorities. While sometimes they mention a few significant historical figures or events which relate to the birth and life of Christ or the beginning of His ministry, little is described of the world outside of the immediate Gospel narrative. So there are no deep explanations or descriptions of history or current events, nor is there much concern for the political, economic or social conditions in Judaea or the greater part of the Roman empire.

The disciples of Christ are focused upon Yahweh their God and their own immediate circumstances, putting their trust in God, and evidently they did not care if the king was bombing Syria, or invading Arabia. Now, that may seem like a sarcastic allusion to today’s circumstances, and it certainly is, but there were similar things happening at the time of John the Baptist, and the writers of the gospels and the portrayals of the characters involved in the ministry of Christ had no concern for them at all.

Before continuing, we must have a digression. Herod the Tetrarch, or Herod Antipas, appears often in all of the gospel accounts of the ministry of Christ. He is a son of the first Herod known from Matthew chapter 2 at the birth of Christ. He is also mentioned in Luke 3:1 as “tetrarch of Galilee”, where we also find another Herod, called Philip, who is called the tetrarch “of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis”. Herod Agrippa I is the Herod of Acts chapter 12. His son Herod Agrippa II is the Agrippa of Acts chapters 25 and 26, and the Bernice mentioned there is the younger Agrippa’s sister, and she is also alleged to have been his wife. The elder Herod Agrippa’s sister is the Herodias of the accounts of the slaying of John the Baptist in the synoptic gospels, and the Herod mentioned there is Herod Antipas. Herod Antipas and Herod Philip were half-brothers, and they had another half-brother, Artistobulus IV, who was the father of the elder Herod Agrippa. All three of the half-brothers had different mothers. Not all writers used the same names consistently for each Herod, so they are very difficult to follow through Scripture and history.

Covenant Theology vs. Replacement Theology with Clifton Emahiser

 

William Finck talks to Clifton Emahiser about Covenant Theology vs. Replacement Theology, and Clifton's experiences debating with members over his own family over his Christian Identity beliefs.

As probably all of our listeners know, Clifton Emahiser had suffered a bad fall in his home last August, so we moved him here to Florida to stay with us. Just before his accident, Clifton had sent me a few short essays to proofread, and finally, after ten months, I have been getting around to it. We posted two of those essays on his website this morning. The first, we presented in a discussion here a few weeks ago, which was Pitfalls Found in Biblical Research Materials, Part 1. I labelled that as “Part 1”, and not Clifton, hoping to encourage him to write a sequel, because it is a topic about which I am certain he has a lot more to say. Now we have Clifton here with us once again to discuss the second of those essays, which I also posted to his website this morning.

Sadly, this turned out to be Clifton's last podcast. We miss him dearly.

On the Gospel of John, Part 4: The Lamb of God

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On the Gospel of John, Part 4: The Lamb of God

Presenting Part 3 of this commentary on the Gospel of John, which was titled The Sons of God, we gave a full explanation of our translation of John 1:11-13, and we cannot sufficiently stress how important it is to understand the impact which one’s worldview can have upon one’s interpretation of Scripture. I also understand that these presentations may at times be very technical and hard to digest. However we must develop a scholarly basis for a proper understanding of the text before we can even begin to claim to understand the Bible. If one is persuaded by the commonly-accepted interpretations of the Jews concerning the ministry of Christ, then it is easy to accept the King James Version and other popular translations of these verses. So like a lamb being led to the slaughter, one may helplessly be led to believe that the universalist perspective of Scripture is true, and that all those who merely profess a belief in Jesus must therefore be accepted as having somehow become “sons of god” by a mere profession of their lips, and as if they could possibly even make that choice on their own.

However that position is actually in direct conflict with Scripture. Christ Himself had said, as it is recorded in Matthew chapter 7, that “21 Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven. 22 Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works? 23 And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity.” Likewise, the apostle James said that “19 Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble.” So we see that mere belief is not enough to somehow make one a child of God, even if it is a belief which is accompanied by “many wonderful works”. But if we believe that every word of God is true, and that the Scriptures do not conflict with themselves, then it is evident that these passages, along with many others found in the gospels, such as the parable of the tares of the field or the statement by Christ concerning plants which Yahweh did not plant, sufficiently indicate that the common interpretations of John 1:11-13 must be wrong.

The Protocols of Satan, Part 39: Who is your god?

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The Protocols of Satan, Part 39: Who is your god?

Before I began last week’s program, I meant to apologize for an error I made in an off-the-cuff remark in part 37 of this series, so I will do that now. As I was presenting my prepared notes, and while searching my mind for the first notable apologist for the capitalist system, the only name I could come up with was Montesquieu, for some reason, and admitted that I may have been incorrect. But that was an error. The name I was looking for was Frédéric Bastiat, the French economist, politician and Freemason whom we had discussed at length in Part 14 of this series on the Protocols. So I apologize for that, and of course I never claimed to be perfect…

For the past several presentations of this series on the Protocols, since Part 35, Inciting Class Warfare, we have been discussing various aspects of a few paragraphs of Protocol No. 3, where the authors had boasted of their intent to incite strife and divisions between the classes, to create a large-scale economic crisis resulting in vast unemployment in Europe which would turn the lower classes to violence against the upper, all as a means of convincing the Goyim to capitulate to their planned Jewish domination of society. This is exactly what happened, and we will culminate that discussion here. Once again, we shall read these paragraphs which we have been discussing from Protocol No. 3, from the text of Boris Brasol’s publication of The Protocols and World Revolution...

On the Gospel of John, Part 3: The Sons of God

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On the Gospel of John, Part 3: The Sons of God

In the opening portions of this commentary on the Gospel of John, we hope to have sufficiently illustrated from Old Testament Scriptures, as well as from the Revelation and other sources, the meanings of the assertions that Yahshua Christ is the Word made Flesh and the Light come into the World, assertions by which the apostle had poetically and confidently attested that Yahshua Christ was indeed Yahweh God Himself, the God of the Old Testament incarnate as a man, and that He was the true Messenger to man sweeping aside all of the false claims of antiquity. So we saw that John, attesting that Christ is the light come into the world, had also made an assertion in reference to Christ which had formerly been claimed by the great kings of antiquity, those of the Hittites, Babylonians, Egyptians and others, who had made that same claim for themselves, even imagining for themselves to be the incarnation of the Sun on earth. Later, in John chapter 12, Christ Himself is recorded as having originated the assertions which John has made for Him here, as the event actually preceded the record.

Then coming to verse 10 of this first chapter of John, we contended with the King James translation of the passage, which reads “He was in the world, and the world was made by him, and the world knew him not.” The meaning of this passage clearly may have been different in the original understanding of the English of 1611, the word world now having a different meaning. Examining that word world, we came to the conclusion that the word would better be translated as society, since it does not refer to the entire planet and everything on it in the way that it is often interpreted today. There are passages in the classical Greek writings where the word appears in broad contexts and may be interpreted as universe, however that is not necessarily the manner in which it was used in the New Testament, and it was not always the manner in which the classical Greek writers had used the term...

End Times Update, May 2018

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This evening we discuss the history of immigration in America, the historic attitudes towards immigration, and how the sudden change in policy in 1965 led to the fulfillment of prophecy we are currently witnessing as all of the world's non-White peoples are being led by Satan against the Camp of the Saints.

We also discuss national average IQ and how it can lead to the anticipated Fall of Babylon as immigration results in White minorities throughout the West.

Below: Lyndon Johnson's remarks as he signed the Immigration Act in 1965

On the Gospel of John, Part 2: The Light of the World

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On the Gospel of John, Part 2: The Light of the World

Introducing our presentation of the Gospel of John in the opening segment of this series, we gave evidence from the earliest post-apostolic Christian writers, the so-called Church Fathers, and from the texts of those books of our Bibles which are attributed to John, which is sufficient to demonstrate that one and the same John the apostle – the young man who of all the apostles had been closest to Christ – was indeed the author of the Revelation, the first epistle of John, and this Gospel. There was also circumstantial evidence given to help establish that John was indeed the author of the two shorter epistles which have been attributed to him from the earliest times.

Here we shall offer a brief summary of our discussion. Little is known of the life of John after the early chapters of Acts, and he last appears in Scripture in Jerusalem in 47 AD, in the events which are recorded in Acts chapter 15 and the early verses of Galatians chapter 2. Later in his life, ostensibly after the deaths of the elder James around 62 AD in Jerusalem and Paul of Tarsus about that same time in Rome, John is in Ephesus where he committed this Gospel to writing. Then during the reign of Domitian, some time after 81 AD John was exiled to Patmos on account of his Christian profession, which is where he received the Revelation. After the death of Domitian in 96 AD, John was able to return to Ephesus. If the Revelation was not already committed to writing, it certainly was after John’s return, which is indicated in the accounts of the early Christian writers. All of John’s three epistles were also written in Ephesus, and very likely around this late time, as John fulfilled the role of an elder and apostle to the Christian assemblies at Ephesus and the neighboring districts. This John had reportedly done until his death some time during the reign of Trajan, which began in 98 and ended in 117 AD. If John were 16 when the ministry of Christ began in 28 AD, he would have been no younger than 86 when he died.

The Protocols of Satan, Part 38: William Jennings Bryan, the Last Viable Political Opposition

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The Protocols of Satan, Part 38: William Jennings Bryan, the Last Viable Political Opposition

The following is a presentation of part of a speech by William Jennings Bryan which was published in The Barnes Review in their March/April 2000 issue. We are presenting this here this evening, as well as an earlier and longer article focusing on Bryan’s political career which was written by Michael Collins Piper in 1996, in order to show that there was viable political opposition to the internationalist designs which ultimately prevailed in the late 19th and early 20th century American politics. However we see William Jennings Bryan as the last of such viable political opposition, and he was defeated time and again, until he finally relented – and later regretted it. Of course, later on there was Huey Long, but the plutocrats had him killed before he ever became a threat.

Imperialism Is Not The American Way by William Jennings Bryan

The editor of The Barnes Review introduces the speech with a description of a cartoon which was reproduced on the issue’s front cover:

At the dawn of the 20th century, when “the old horse got too slow for Uncle Sam” (as the Judge cartoon which is our cover illustration this month so quaintly put it), one of the most vociferous critics of the newly burgeoning U.S. internationalism (soon to be called "gunboat diplomacy") was populist figure William Jennings Bryan, known as “the Great Commoner.”

The cartoon, pictured here, may have been better described. According to Wikipedia, “Judge was a weekly satirical magazine published in the United States from 1881 to 1947.” Reportedly the magazine openly supported the Republican Party. However the many Victor Gillam cartoons which it published expressed sentiments which were against immigration, internationalism and imperialism, things which the Republican Party had supported. William Jennings Bryan was anti-Imperialist and populist Democrat.

On the Gospel of John, Part 1: The Word Made Flesh

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On the Gospel of John, Part 1: The Word Made Flesh

Christianity is Divine Truth which stands opposed to worldly philosophies. Therefore the LOGOS cannot be described in accordance with worldly philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle. Anyone who attempts to do so, fails miserably.

Here we shall endeavor a presentation and commentary of the Gospel of John. This Gospel is unlike any of the others, which parallel one another in many ways and which are for that reason called the Synoptic Gospels. None of the writers of these other gospels were witnesses to the entire ministry of Christ, and therefore they also relied on accounts provided by others, in whole or in part. Before discussing John, we shall explain this briefly, but we must warn that the documentation or reasoning which supports these brief explanations is found throughout our other commentaries, and we can not repeat it all here. We will, however, see some of our evidence in the words of the early Christian writers as we cite them in our discussion of John.

Pitfalls Found in Biblical Research Materials, Part 1 with Clifton Emahiser

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Pitfalls Found in Biblical Research Materials, Part 1 with Clifton Emahiser

Last August Clifton Emahiser, being 90 years old at the time, had taken a bad fall in his home. At that time he realized that he really could not live alone safely any longer, and we brought him here to Florida to stay with us. In the meantime, just before his accident Clifton had sent me three new short essays to proofread, which I never got to until now. So we will begin trying to make that up to him with this evening’s presentation. Here we have Clifton Emahiser with us once again, to present and discuss one of those short essays, which he had titled The Pitfalls Found In Biblical Commentaries, Lexicons & Dictionaries.

It seems to me that Clifton may have planned for this to be another multi-part series, since while the title is broad in scope, here he mainly focuses on the rather recently-developed denominational doctrines of Futurism and Preterism, and how they have affected modern Christian thinking which is reflected in their inclusion in certain popular Study Bibles and Commentaries. While Clifton has treated this topic in the past, here it is presented in a somewhat different context, and he goes further to show how recent these and other ideas about Scripture have been developed by certain denominations.

So now we shall present Clifton’s essay, along with our own comments and discussion:

The Pitfalls Found In Biblical Commentaries, Lexicons & Dictionaries, by Clifton Emahiser

While some of these Biblical helps are better than others, even the best have some serious errors! For instance some Bible cross-references can lead one astray, so let’s consider some of the better center-references found in a few Bibles:

If you have a King James Version Bible with the proper center reference, you can very readily prove Two Seedline teaching with it, for it will take you from one supporting verse of Scripture to another almost endlessly on the subject. (Not that the King James Version is an especially advisable Bible to use for study, as it is alleged to contain approximately 27,000 translation mistakes.)

That assertion is often repeated in Christian Identity circles, that there are 27,000 translation mistakes in the King James Version. Comparet made the assertion inn part 8 of his Revelation series. Swift may have also made it. It is hard to fathom, however, because there are only 31,102 verses! However perhaps the assertion becomes more plausible when things are pointed out such as the substitution of the name Yahweh with the phrase “the Lord”, which happened on over 7,200 occasions in the Old Testament alone. So in effect that alone would be 7,200 mistranslations.

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