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Paul’s First Epistle to the Thessalonians, Part 2: Persecution of the Saints

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Paul’s First Epistle to the Thessalonians, Part 2: Persecution of the Saints

The Roman historian Suetonius, who lived from about 69 AD to about 140 AD, had a career as the director of the imperial archives under the emperor Trajan. So he must have had a lot of first-hand information upon which to base his histories of the lives of the Roman emperors. In his Lives of the Twelve Caesars, in The Life of Cladius, chapter 25, Suetonius said of Claudius, in brief, that “Since the Judaeans constantly made disturbances at the instigation of Chrestus, he expelled them from Rome.” In spite of the bickering over this passage by modern Jews and assorted other scoffers, this brief note must be a reference to the same event which is also noted in Acts chapter 18, where it is recorded that as Paul is in Corinth, he meets Priscilla and Aquila, who were there “on account of Klaudios ordering all of the Judaeans to depart from Rome”. Those who doubt the connection of this reference in Suetonius to early Christianity conveniently assert that there must have been some other Chrestus who caused such a disturbance, among other claims. (It seems that Suetonius did write Christians where he mentioned them again in his life of Nero, 16.2.) But there were certainly Christians in Rome by this time, which is evident as Paul, writing his epistle to the Romans in 57 AD, attests that many Christian assemblies were already established in Rome, and one of the major themes of that epistle is the reasons for the divisions between Christians and Jews.

The mistaking of Chrestus (meaning The Good One) for Christos (meaning The Anointed One), or Christ, was not uncommon among the Romans, Tacitus was also confused over the name in that same manner. But the error even appears in some of the Greek manuscripts of the New Testament writings. In Acts 11:26 and 26:28 the Codex Sinaiticus (א) has Chrestian(s) rather than Christian(s). Certain early and notable Christian writers made remarks attempting to correct the confusion. In the late 3rd century the Christian writer Lactantius wrote concerning the name of Christ because, as he himself had said, “the meaning of this name must be set forth, on account of the error of the ignorant, who by the change of a letter are accustomed to call Him Chrestus.” (The Divine Institutes, Book 4, Chapter 7) But perhaps a hundred years earlier, Tertullian had written that “The name Christian, however, so far as its meaning goes, bears the sense of anointing. Even when by a faulty pronunciation you call us “Chrestians” (for you are not certain about even the sound of this noted name), you in fact lisp out the sense of pleasantness and goodness.” (Ad Nationes, Book I Chapter III) Then, at least threescore years before Tertullian, in the mid-2nd century, the Christian apologist Justin Martyr, writing only a short time after Suetonius had made a play on words relating to the error, by writing “For we are accused of being Christians, and to hate what is excellent (or chrestian) is unjust.” (The First Apology of Justin, Chapter IV)

The Jews in Europe: The Reuchlin Affair Revisited, Part 2

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The Jews in Europe: The Reuchlin Affair Revisited, Part 2

In the first segment of our presentation from chapter 7 of The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit and its Impact on World History by E. Michael Jones, we saw how it was that Johannes Reuchlin, a trained lawyer and a man who in his own time was widely considered to be one of the greatest scholars in Europe – second only to Erasmus of Rotterdam – became infatuated with the Kabbalah and took upon himself the role as defender of the Talmud and the other anti-Christian writings of the Jews. However it is important to understand that this was only a part, although it was a significant and important part, of the much wider unrest within the Church itself in regard to literary and scientific studies. Jones had stated in the first part of this chapter that “Humanistic studies of the sort promoted by Erasmus of Rotterdam had suggested that a new day of Enlightened tolerance was about to dawn after the long night of scholastic obscurantism, and so the Jews were emboldened to act.”

It is readily evident that at this time the limitations which the institutions within the Roman Catholic Church had long imposed upon the study and publication of profane literature were being increasingly rebelled against by men within those Church institutions, and Erasmus was a leader in that struggle. In Part 3 of our series on Martin Luther in Life and Death, we had said the following about Erasmus:

Paul’s First Epistle to the Thessalonians, Part 1: Mercy may be by grace, but election is by race.

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Paul’s First Epistle to the Thessalonians, Part 1: Mercy may be by grace, but election is by race.

In the Christogenea New Testament, Thessalonians is spelled Thessalonikeans, as that is a transliteration of the way that it was spelled by the Greeks, and in our translations we endeavored to maintain the Greek forms of at least most of the names. But before speaking about Thessalonika, we will speak briefly about Thessaly, from whence the name of the city had originated. However Thessalonika was not properly in Thessaly, at least so far as the borders of the Hellenistic and Roman periods were defined. We spoke of these places in our Acts chapter 17 presentation two-and-a-half years ago, and noticed an error which we must correct.

Thessaly was the part of central mainland Greece north of ancient Attica, Boeotia and Euboea, with Epirus to the west and Makedonia to the north. The Aegean Sea was on the east. It must be noted, that in ancient times the Greek provinces never really had definite borders. They more or less described the somewhat fluid areas of habitat of the Greek tribes, which occupied greater or lesser territory as their populations or military strength either increased or diminished over time. As Makedonia increased in political power, the perceived territory of adjoining regions such as Thessaly and Thrace was diminished.

Strabo, in the ninth book of his Geography tells us that Thessaly was in early times populated by the same Phoenicians who built the Greek city of Thebes (9.2.3). There was even a river in the area named Phoenix. However the Pelasgians were imagined to have inhabited the area originally, even before the mythical flood of Deucalion, after which they were said to have been driven out. Strabo says later in that same book “Now the largest and most ancient composite part of the Greeks is that of the Thessalians, who have been described partly by Homer and partly by others.” Makedonia did not exist as a political entity in the period of which Homer had written. There are ancient connections between the inhabitants of Thessaly and Aeolia, a region on the coast of Anatolia near the Troad which included a group of islands in the adjoining sea. Certain peoples of Thessaly, namely the Magnesians and the Aenianians, are said to have been Aeolian in origin.

The Jews in Europe: The Reuchlin Affair Revisited, Part 1

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The Jews in Europe: The Reuchlin Affair Revisited, Part 1

Over these last several months we have spent a lot of time discussing the early years of the Reformation relative to the life of Martin Luther. Discussing things such as the early humanists in Germany and the Reuchlin affair, we had frequently stated that we wanted to better quantify the role of the Jews who were indeed operating behind the scenes of these events. Since that time, we have learned that E. Michael Jones, in his book The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit and its Impact on World History, has done much of that research for us. Therefore we are going to make a presentation of chapter 7 of Jones’ book, which is titled Reuchlin v. Pfefferkorn. We believe that revisiting the Reuchlin Affair from Jones’ enhanced perspective, where he focuses on aspects of the Jewish question which our German historians had neglected, will not only enhance our understanding of the nature and objectives of some of Luther’s supporters during the Reformation, but also exhibit for us the Jewish mentality that agitated the later Revolutions in Europe and produced the Protocols of Zion. Both of these topics are of great interest in relation to our presentations here over the last year, and those which we hope to make here in the near future.

So without further introduction, we shall commence with E. Michael Jones:

Roughly 270 years after Nicholas Donin persuaded Pope Gregory IX to allow him to proceed against the Talmud, another Jew converted to Christianity and had the same idea. In 1504, Josef Pfefferkorn, a Moravian Jew, converted to Christianity, along with his wife and child. After changing his name to Johannes at his baptism, Pfefferkorn spent his first years as a Christian wandering through southern German-speaking lands preaching the conversion of the Jews. In 1509 he settled in Cologne, where he made contact with the Dominicans, who had promoted Donin's efforts to convert the Jews three centuries earlier. Pfefferkorn's enthusiasm for the Christian faith was undeniable, but the results of his preaching were meager. In 1516, at the height of his fame, he claimed he had converted 14 Jews after years of effort. He claimed another five would have entered the Church if the Jews hadn't blackened his name. Pfefferkorn would become famous as a publicist, not as a preacher. The printing press was transforming the movement of information in Europe, and he made good use of this new technology.

A critical review of the sermon Let's Examine the Evidence, by Bertrand Comparet

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Bertrand ComparetA Critical Review of Let’s Examine the Evidence, by Bertrand Comparet

This evening we are going to present a sermon by Bertrand Comparet titled Let’s Examine the Evidence. The purpose of the sermon is to prove through an assessment of certain of the parables of Yahshua Christ that the New Testament is consistent and contiguous with the Word of God in the Old Testament, and therefore that all of the promises of the Old still stand for the children of Israel under the New.

We are going to offer several of our own comments both supporting Comparet’s work, and sometimes criticizing and seeking to correct his work. As we have often said concerning Bertrand Comparet and other Christian Identity teachers of the past, we owe them a debt of gratitude for the wonderful work and excellent research which they did, blazing a trail for us in our quest for Biblical truth. But we also owe it to them and to ourselves to correct any errors they made along the way, and to further edify the work which they left us. We would be honored if in the future, others did that same thing with our own work.

If our text here varies slightly from what is posted at the Bertrand Comparet archive at Christogenea, it is only because we amended parts of Clifton’s original publication from a taped presentation made by Comparet himself, and then we realized that two different taped presentations of Comparet’s sermon exist in our archives, so the slight differences were probably made by Comparet himself.

The Jews in Europe: The Converso Problem and the Inquisition, Part 2

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The Jews in Europe: The Converso Problem and the Inquisition, Part 2

Here we shall offer a summary background loosely based upon what we had seen in the first segment of this presentation, adding a few of our own opinions.

After the Visigoths of Spain had converted to Christianity, and began to regulate their kingdom with Christian principles, life for the Jews became quite intolerable. Laws were made whereby Jews could no longer lend money to Christians on usury, Jews could no longer hold office or rule over Christians, and other laws by which they could no longer live as parasites on the larger White society. Jews had thrived for centuries in pagan Spain, and the parasites were not going to let themselves be deprived of such a profitable host. So in the 7th century the Jews reacted by bringing the moslems into Spain in order to destroy the Gothic kingdom. Perhaps around two-thirds of the Iberian peninsula came to be ruled and also occupied by Arabs and Moors for over 7 centuries. But when the moslems were finally being forced out in the Reconquest, the Jews remained, their role in the moslem invasion being quite obscure to most all Spaniards, and, unfortunately, even to most Christians today.

We can search out the events leading up to the moslem invasions of North Africa and Spain, and we may find that Jews created the moslem religion for the very purpose of organizing the Arab hordes against Christendom. While that is outside of the scope of our purpose here, the result stands as the first proof of the assertion.

Paul's Epistle to the Colossians Part 7: Christianity and Slavery, with Philemon

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Paul's Epistle to the Colossians Part 7: Christianity and Slavery, with Philemon

One of the underlying themes we have been building upon from what Paul of Tarsus has taught us in the first several chapters of this epistle to the Colossians is judgment. Paul of Tarsus began when he advised these Christians of Colossae that they should let no man judge them concerning feasts, sabbaths and other celebrations, and then he also informed them that they should not submit to the ordinances of the men, nor should they worship angels, as he called them, who would prevent them from the use of those elements of God’s Creation that are beneficial to the satisfaction of the flesh, which was basically a refutation of both Pharisaism and asceticism, or, as the King James Version translates the term, “will worship”, which describes asceticism.

However Paul also informed these Colossians that, because they had an assurance of life in Christ, they should choose to abstain from the sins of the world, fornications, evil desires, covetousness, which Paul identified as a form of idolatry, and “filthy communications”, among which are blasphemies, deceits, slanders, ribaldry, and even the wrath of men.

Saying these things, Paul explained that in Christ “one is not Greek and Judaean, circumcision and uncircumcision, Barbarian, Scythian, slave, free, but altogether and in all ways Anointed.” Paul made a similar statement in Galatians chapter 3, where he had said, as it reads in the King James Version, “26 For ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus. 27 For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ. 28 There is neither Jew [properly Judaean] nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus.” And here is where many supposedly pious Christians have found, or have even created much confusion.

The Jews in Europe: The Converso Problem and the Inquisition, Part 1

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The Jews in Europe: The Converso Problem and the Inquisition, Part 1

Over these last several months we have spent a lot of time discussing the early years of the Reformation relative to the life of Martin Luther. Discussing things such as the rise of humanism in Germany and the Reuchlin affair, as well as the fact that the support of humanists was crucial to the success of Luther’s cause in the years after the Reuchlin affair, we had frequently stated that we wanted to better quantify the role of the Jews who were indeed operating behind the scenes of these events.

There were, of course, converso Jews who were operating out in the open, and they could do so because they were supposed converts. Presenting Martin Luther’s On the Jews and Their Lies, we discussed the many converso Jews whose writings Luther had studied, and whose arguments he had adopted and employed against religious Jews. So Martin Luther himself had gotten much of his theological understanding from the Jews. But, for an even more pertinent example, we had also pointed out how Johannes Pfefferkorn, one of the leading voices against Johannes Reuchlin, was himself a converso Jew who had taken it upon himself to assume the role of spokesman for those who were opposed to Reuchlin, stepping out in front of the more traditionally conservative Dominican monks. We hope to have made it apparent that the Dominican monks had a dispute with Reuchlin with or without Pfefferkorn, but the converso Jew nevertheless became the leading voice and agitator for action.

And the illustration of this Jewish proclivity for undermining and dividing Christendom through agitation is one of the primary motives behind the writing of the book, The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit and its Impact on World History, by E. Michael Jones. In his book, Jones has already researched and elucidated many aspects of the Jewish role in these significant events of Christian history. Therefore, we are persuaded that a presentation of some of Jones’ work will greatly augment what we have been presenting in our series on Martin Luther and the Reformation. But we are also persuaded that this will serve as a necessary prerequisite to our future presentations of the Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion, which we had already hoped to resume, and which we plan to resume after we present some of the pertinent chapters from Jones’ book. We believe that these presentations will therefore enhance our understanding not only of the Reformation when we resume with our discussion of that, but also of the mentality and objectives of the authors of the Protocols themselves, as we have already demonstrated that the Protocols are certainly not mere forgeries.

Paul's Epistle to the Colossians Part 6: The Indwelling Word

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Paul's Epistle to the Colossians Part 6: The Indwelling Word

Presenting the last two segments of Paul’s epistle to the Colossians, we made digressions to discuss several things which Paul may not have addressed explicitly, but which certainly are related to Paul’s message. The first of these addressed substance pharisaism. There are many substance pharisees who seek to judge other men for partaking of things which Yahweh’s law does not proscribe. Some of these things are a part of Yahweh’s very creation, and therefore He provided them. So if our God provided them, and did not prohibit them in His law, how could we justify prohibiting them? How could we condemn men for using such substances? The truth is that we cannot justly prohibit our brethren from anything which the law of our God does not prohibit. If we do, then we imagine ourselves to be as gods, like the high priests that Paul had scathingly criticized in his second epistle to the Thessalonians. They were sitting in the temple of God, exalting themselves above everything that was truly godly, and imagined themselves to be as gods. When man makes his own laws rather than seeking to uphold Yahweh’s law, he becomes an idolater because he is certainly not God. Yahweh did not give men laws as a supplement to man’s law. Rather, He gave men laws to live by, and when they do, they are free of the tyranny of men.

Another sort of pharisaism which we addressed was word pharisaism. The word pharisees insist upon controlling the lexicons of others. So where Paul had advised at Ephesians 4:29, for instance, to “let no unwholesome word proceed from your mouth”, as one translation has it, they imagine that to refer to literal words rather than to lies, flattery, threats, provocations, ribaldry, statements which are actually damaging regardless of what sort of words are used to express them. Likewise, here in Colossians 3:8 Paul admonished against “filthy communications”, or as we would translate the phrase, “abusive language”, or perhaps “shameful language”. The shallow, Judaized denominational Christian imagines these passages to be talking about certain words when they are really admonishing men not to lie to one another, not to slander one another, not to blaspheme God, not to use flattery and deceit, or any of the other things which men say and do to one another whether they be done with language that is "nice" or "naughty". But these passages do not advocate word pharisaism.

Paul's Epistle to the Colossians Part 5: Bad Words and “Filthy Communications”

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Paul's Epistle to the Colossians Part 5: Bad Words and “Filthy Communications”

Thankfully, bad words and filthy communications are not all we have to discuss this evening, however we seem to constantly be confronted by what I can only call “word Pharisees”, and they certainly need to be addressed.

In our recent discussions of Colossians chapter 2, we had seen Paul of Tarsus assert that because the children of Israel were freed from the ordinances of the law by the sacrifice of Yahshua Christ, Christians should not seek to judge one another based on those ordinances. Therefore Paul said “no one must judge you in food and in drink, or in respect of feast or new month or of the Sabbaths.” Of course, Paul was not telling Christians to disregard the sabbaths and the feasts, which he had advised them elsewhere to observe. Rather, he must have meant that no one should judge them as to how they observe those things, and especially concerning all of the commandments of men that were added to God’s laws regulating them.

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