Anabasis by Xenophon

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Anabasis, by Xenophon, Produced by John Bickers, and David Widger

ANABASIS

 

By Xenophon

 

Translation by H. G. Dakyns



                  Dedicated To
                  Rev. B. Jowett, M.A.
                  Master of Balliol College
                  Regius Professor of Greek in the University of Oxford
        
                  Xenophon the Athenian was born 431 B.C. He was a
                  pupil of Socrates. He marched with the Spartans,
                  and was exiled from Athens. Sparta gave him land
                  and property in Scillus, where he lived for many
                  years before having to move once more, to settle
                  in Corinth. He died in 354 B.C.

                  The Anabasis is his story of the march to Persia
                  to aid Cyrus, who enlisted Greek help to try and
                  take the throne from Artaxerxes, and the ensuing
                  return of the Greeks, in which Xenophon played a
                  leading role. This occurred between 401 B.C. and
                  March 399 B.C.
        

 

PREPARER'S NOTE

This was typed from Dakyns' series, "The Works of Xenophon," a four-volume set. The complete list of Xenophon's works (though there is doubt about some of these) is:

     Work                                   Number of books

     The Anabasis                                        7
     The Hellenica                                        7
     The Cyropaedia                                      8
     The Memorabilia                                    4
     The Symposium                                    1
     The Economist                                       1
     On Horsemanship                                  1
     The Sportsman                                     1
     The Cavalry General                               1
     The Apology                                          1
     On Revenues                                        1
     The Hiero                                             1
     The Agesilaus                                       1
     The Polity of the Athenians and the Lacedaemonians   2

Text in brackets "{}" is my transliteration of Greek text into English using an Oxford English Dictionary alphabet table. The diacritical marks have been lost.

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