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TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 24

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TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 24

In the last few presentations in this series we have been discussing particular passages in the New Testament where certain terms are mistranslated or misunderstood, which also adversely affect the interpretation of the Scriptures throughout the New Testament. While we cannot discuss every error of interpretation, we have endeavored to address the passages which would change one’s view of Scripture, and potentially one’s entire worldview, once they are translated properly and understood correctly within the context of the entire Scripture. With these interpretations which we uphold to be correct, all of the seeming conflicts and inconsistencies within Scripture vanish, God is no longer the hypocrite which the denominational churches make Him out to be, and we can know that God is true. So now, continuing with Proof 44, we are in the midst of the Gospel of Luke, as we had left off with the parable of the unrighteous steward in chapter 16.

44) continued: Specific NT Verse misteachings, mistranslations or corruptions in Matthew, Mark and Luke

In the parable of the unrighteous steward in Luke chapter 16 we saw that Yahshua Christ was actually contrasting men of different races, and He used the term for race, which is γενεά, in order to make that comparison. Those two races were descibed in an allegory as the “sons of light” and the “sons of this age”, or world. The wicked steward was praised by his master for his wickedness, because he acted as one may expect of a man of a wicked race. The parable is a lesson in human nature, that one’s nature and the resulting actions are inherent and cannot be changed for the better if one is a devil or a bastard in the first place. But now, in Luke chapter 17, we shall see that the Greeks viewed race even more narrowly than we are accustomed to perceive race today.

The Day The Word Became Flesh, a review of a paper by Clifton Emahiser

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After many discussions this past week in the Christogenea forums and chats, I thought that perhaps it is an appropriate time to present:

The Day The Word Became Flesh, a review of a paper by Clifton Emahiser

Countless men have attempted to understand the Genesis account of Creation, which begins with a statement that “God created the heaven and the earth”, and then the first actual utterance ascribed to God is “Let there be light”, before it goes on to describe His actual creation of the heaven and preparation of the earth for habitation. Several verses after the proclamation “let there be light”, we see the sun, moon and stars were created, which are the only sources of light perceived by man, other than earthly sources such as fire or man-made light. Therefore, from the Genesis account alone, we cannot know what that light of Genesis 1:3 is, where God had said “let there be light”, and where He first distinguished day and night, even before the sun, moon and stars were created.

But these are certainly not contradictions in the Genesis account, and in spite of the fact that many fundamentalists of the past have insisted that the Creation account is absolutely literal and even “scientific”, it should rather be apparent to Christians that the events of Creation were explained in a manner by which the full meaning and truth of at least some of its statements would not become apparent until the revelation of the Gospel of Christ. Neither is the Creation account complete, as it does not describe the creation of things which are not regularly manifest on the earth, such as wicked spirits or angels, whether they be good or evil. As it is expressed in Matthew chapter 13, since Christ came to reveal things kept secret from the foundation of the world, the entire account of creation was certainly not included in Genesis, or things could not have been kept secret.

TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 23

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TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 23

In our last presentation, of Proof 44 in this list of 100 proofs, we discussed particular passages in the Gospel of John where certain terms are mistranslated or misunderstood, which also adversely affect the interpretation of the Scriptures throughout the New Testament. While we did not discuss every possible error of interpretation in John, we sought to address the passages which would change one’s view of Scripture, and potentially one’s entire worldview, once they are translated properly and understood correctly within the context of the entire Scripture. With these interpretations which we uphold to be correct, all of the seeming conflicts and inconsistencies within Scripture vanish, God is no longer the hypocrite which the denominational churches make Him out to be, and we can know that God is true. So now, continuing with Proof 44, we will endeavor to do this same thing in the so-called Synoptic Gospels, which are Matthew, Mark and Luke.

44) continued: Specific NT Verse misteachings, mistranslations or corruptions in Matthew, Mark and Luke

While there are not a lot of mistranslations or misunderstandings in the Synoptic Gospels, there are some critical ones, and we have already spoken about some obvious misunderstandings. For example, where in Matthew 3:7 we see John the Baptist calling certain of the Pharisees and Sadducees a “generation of vipers”, the word translated as generation is γέννημα, which literally means offspring. So in essence, John is calling the parents of these men vipers, and not the men themselves. The same phrase appears where Christ used it in the same manner of His adversaries in Matthew chapters 12 and 23. The use of the phrase proves that there is an actual race of men referred to as vipers in Judaea at the time of Christ, or both He and John are mere slanderers, the parents of these men not being present to defend themselves against the accusation.

On the Wisdom of Solomon, Part 20: The Paths to Hell

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On the Wisdom of Solomon, Part 20: The Paths to Hell

Of course, when I use the word hell here, I am using it metaphorically to describe the punishments we suffer for the consequences of our sin in this life, which is how the word Gehenna was used by Christ Himself in the New Testament.

One dictionary informs us that a cliché is generally a phrase or opinion that is “overused and betrays a lack of original thought on the part of the speaker.” But if the cliché is true, perhaps it reflects the only valid reaction which the speaker should have to a given situation. In those cases, it may be reckless to simply dismiss an idea because it is a cliché, at least by some portion of those who hear it. Repent. Jesus is coming. These warnings have become meaningless clichés in our modern society, since few people believe them and as Jewish entertainment and media has mocked them in various ways for many decades. But they are still true, whether the enemies of Christ mock them or not.

In our last presentation in this commentary on the Wisdom of Solomon, we discussed the patterns of idolatry, the inevitable decadence which results from idolatry, and how the ancient Israelites were oppressed by their enemies every time they turned to idolatry until they were finally sent off into captivity. The lessons from history could not be more clear. What matters is not what our enemies are doing, or what they may be trying to do. What really matters is only what we, the modern nations of Christendom, White Europeans, are doing as a people. When we turn to idolatry and sin, we shall inevitably be oppressed by our enemies. When Jews and all those who hate Christ rule over us, it is only because we have sinned, and there will never be a solution until we repent.

TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 22

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TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 22

In our last presentation, which was Proof 43 in this list of 100 proofs, we discussed particular passages in the Old Testament where certain terms are mistranslated or misunderstood, which also adversely affect the interpretation of the Scriptures throughout the entire Bible. Doing that, we did not discuss every possible error of interpretation in the Old Testament, but rather we only sought to address the passages which would change one’s view of Scripture, and potentially one’s entire worldview, once they are understood correctly within the context of the entire Scripture. With these interpretations which we uphold to be correct, all of the seeming conflicts and inconsistencies within Scripture vanish, God is no longer the hypocrite which the denominational churches make Him out to be, and we can know that God is true. So now, here beginning with Proof 44, we will endeavor to do this same thing in the New Testament.

44) Specific NT Verse misteachings, mistranslations or corruptions

The first verses we should probably discuss are John 1:11-13, although we will surely return to Matthew, Mark and Luke a little later on. The denominational Christians twist the meaning of these verses in John to prove at once the chosen people myth of the Jews, and then the idea that anyone who professes to believe somehow becomes a child of God, an idea which itself conflicts with the chosen people myth of the Jews. The truth is, that these verses are not necessarily saying what they have been translated to say. What we are going to say about these verses here is mostly based on a 2006 essay I had written titled Translating John 1:11-13, which were actually based on the translation notes I made when I translated John. So I elaborated on them once again in Part 3 of my commentary of the Gospel of John, which was titled The Sons of God. Here I will attempt to condense those explanations, if it is possible.

Twelve Years of Christogenea - Open Forum Discussion

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While we did not really speak much about Christogenea, that is okay, there are certainly more pressing matters to speak about. So the recent events in Washington DC and certain Identity Christians who have renewed the heresy of the Trinity Doctrine were the subjects which consumed most of the evening.

There were still some minor technical problems, but we are improving. We hope to do an Open Forum at least once each quarter this coming year, so we will do this again in early April!

 

TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 21

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TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 21

Having finally finished with Proof 42 and our discussion of words which are generally mistranslated or misunderstood throughout the Bible, now we turn to particular passages where certain words are mistranslated or misunderstood, which also adversely affect the interpretation of the Scriptures throughout the entire Bible.

43) Specific OT Verse misteachings, mistranslations or corruptions

Genesis 2:9

The first misteaching, of course, is not to properly recognize the allegories of Genesis chapters 2 and 3, even if they cannot be fully understood until Christ explained them in the parables and visions of the Gospel and Revelation. In Genesis chapter 2 there are two trees which are different from all the other trees. All of the actual wooden trees created by God were made to come out of the ground, and they were made to be good for food, but two other trees are mentioned apart from those trees, as we first read in that same chapter: “9 And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil.”

Throughout Scripture trees are used as allegories for races or nations of people. But later, in the Gospel, Christ identifies the Tree of Life where He says in John chapter 15: “1 I am the true vine, and my Father is the husbandman. 2 Every branch in me that beareth not fruit he taketh away: and every branch that beareth fruit, he purgeth it, that it may bring forth more fruit. 3 Now ye are clean through the word which I have spoken unto you. 4 Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; no more can ye, except ye abide in me.” Proclaiming that He is the “true vine” also reveals the possibility that there is a spurious vine.

On the Wisdom of Solomon, Part 19: Patterns of Idolatry

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On the Wisdom of Solomon, Part 19: Patterns of Idolatry

When I began to write this commentary, I honestly thought that I would finish with Wisdom chapter 13 this evening. But in fact, we will not even begin chapter 13. I had so much to write about concerning these last 4 verses of chapter 12, that we will only finish that chapter.

In our last presentation in this commentary of the Wisdom of Solomon, Lessons from History, we noted how Solomon had used the circumstances relating to the Canaanites in ancient Israel in order to show that wicked races cannot ever conform themselves to the righteousness of God for reason that they are bastards, and because they are corrupt from the beginning, from their very genesis or origin. So for that reason he attested that they will never be able to amend themselves. Then we illustrated how this same lesson is taught throughout Scripture, from the dialogue between Yahweh and Cain and Cain’s immediate actions thereafter, to the dialogues between John the Baptist and Yahshua Christ with the descendants of Cain, in the persons of the Edomite Canaanites of their own time. So in that regard, we should also consider what things befell both John and Christ as a result of those dialogues. Making that illustration, we also noted how Wisdom helps us to understand and explain this phenomenon, as it certainly is a lesson which we must derive from history. That is because, contrary to the insistences of the world, bastards will never please God, and neither will we ourselves please Him so long as we continue to produce or to countenance bastards.

The bastard races of Solomon’s time were engaging in fornication, adultery and Sodomy, among other crimes. But here in Wisdom, Solomon had specifically used infanticide, their sacrificing of their own children to pagan idols, as the foremost example of their wickedness. Many critics of Christianity wrongly accuse the God of the Old Testament of advocating such a thing, because of the demand that Isaac be sacrificed. However infanticide is clearly denounced throughout the Bible, and the trial of Abraham was for a greater purpose as well as an illustration, because Isaac’s life was not taken, while at the same time the practice was common among Abraham’s Canaanite neighbors. But no matter how revolting the act is in the minds of Christians today, child sacrifice was a reality of life in the ancient pagan world, and it was not limited to the land of Canaan.

TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 20

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TruthVid's 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White, Part 20

This is our fifth discussion of point 42 in TruthVid’s 100 Proofs that the Israelites were White. Once again, we have already explained that this review of the meanings of certain words does not explicitly prove the race of the Israelites. But understanding the true meanings of many Biblical terms does help to prove that word meanings were obfuscated by the churches so as to distort the many other evidences that the message of Christ and His apostles and prophets is solely intended for White Europeans.

42 continued) Major word mistranslations or misunderstandings that occur repeatedly throughout the Bible.

Satan and the Devil

The word satan is a common Hebrew word which was used in the New Testament in a particular manner, and therefore in order to properly understand what it means we must examine its use and meaning in Old Testament Hebrew. In many passages, it is clear that a satan is only an opponent or adversary, and in many different contexts the word was applied to men. For example, David was called a satan or adversary to the Philistines in 1 Samuel 29:4, and Hadad the Edomite was called a satan, or adversary, to Solomon in 1 Kings 11:14. Rezon the son of Eliadah was also a satan or adversary to Israel in the days of Solomon, in 1 Kings 11:25. From the perspective of men, even an angel of Yahweh was an adversary, or satan to Balaam in Numbers 22:22. Then in the same context later in the chapter, at 22:32, the same word, satan, is a verb translated as withstand.

But not all opponents or adversaries are also capital ‘s’ Satans, even while there are capital ‘s’ satans. Grammatically, one difference between Satan, with a capital ‘s’, denoting a particular Satan for which reason we prefer to translate it as Satan in that manner, and an adversary who may be just about anyone at one point in time or another, is in what is called a Substantive. A Substantive is a word or group of words which are not typically nouns, but are employed as nouns in a given context. In Hebrew or Greek Substantives are quite common. Combined with a definite article, the noun is used to represent a particular entity, and not just any one of an entity which fits the description in the definition of the noun. In language, when the definite article accompanies a noun or Substantive, it indicates that the subject referred to by the noun has already been mentioned, or is common knowledge, or is about to be defined.

On the Wisdom of Solomon, Part 18: Lessons from History

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On the Wisdom of Solomon, Part 18: Lessons from History

In our commentary on Wisdom chapter 11, titled The Wisdom in History, we hope to have illustrated not only how Solomon had deduced lessons from history which are not always obvious to the casual reader or observer, but also how his conclusions agreed with both the words of the prophets and those of the apostles of Christ. For example, in the last three verses of Wisdom chapter 11, we read: “24 For thou lovest all the things that are, and abhorrest nothing which thou hast made: for never wouldest thou have made any thing, if thou hadst hated it. 25 And how could any thing have endured, if it had not been thy will? or been preserved, if not called by thee? 26 But thou sparest all: for they are thine, O Lord, thou lover of souls.” In Genesis chapter 1, everything Yahweh God made was good.

To that we had compared the words of Isaiah chapter 43: “1 But now thus saith the LORD that created thee, O Jacob, and he that formed thee, O Israel, Fear not: for I have redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name; thou art mine.” We also compared the words of Paul of Tarsus from 1 Corinthians chapter 6: “20 For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God's.” Now we must ask, who was bought with a price? We find the answer to that question in Isaiah chapter 52 where it speaks of the children of Israel in captivity and we read: “3 For thus saith the LORD, Ye have sold yourselves for nought; and ye shall be redeemed without money.” The children of Israel were bought with a price, which is the blood of Christ by which they alone were redeemed.

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