Critiques of Bertrand Comparet Sermons


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Noah's Flood Was Not World Wide – a Critical Review of a sermon by Bertrand Comparet

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Noah's Flood Was Not World Wide

We are in Bristol, Tennessee this week, and while I was pondering what to present for this evening, and considering the circumstances which made our travel necessary in the first place, I could think of nothing more appropriate than a critical review of Bertrand Comparet's sermon, Noah's Flood Was Not World Wide .

Before preparing for this presentation, it had probably been at least 22 years since I read this sermon. When I did, I was quite disappointed in many ways which shall become evident as I proceed. While we love Bertrand Comparet, and while he was certainly a notable pioneer trailblazing our path to Christian Identity truth, he nevertheless maintained some critical errors, and they are evident in the conflicts which we shall find here in his own words. So I pray that a critique of this sermon also illustrates the need that we continually examine ourselves, because when something is true, it should be able to withstand all challenges.

As nearly all of our copies of Bertrand Comparet's sermons, this one was taken from Jeanne Snyder's transcriptions which were published under the title Your Heritage, and digitized and prepared for electronic publication by Clifton Emahiser, who had also added some of his own notes. Here in this particular sermon Clifton added only one brief note, which I will insert at the appropriate point. Of course, since this is a critical review, I will also add much of my own commentary.

When Clifton published these, he did not ask me to proofread them, or perhaps there may have been many more notes included in his original. The only Comparet sermons he published which Clifton had asked me to proofread are the Revelation sermons, and with that he published quite a few of my notes. Here, I will have many contentions and differences of opinion with Comparet, although we certainly agree on the general fact, that Noah's flood was not worldwide.

The Gospel of the Kingdom

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The Gospel of the Kingdom

Tonight’s program is really a sort of sequel to our presentation last week, This is Not White Supremacy, It is God Supremacy, although it also stands by itself so that last week’s presentation is really not a prerequisite. Here we shall discuss The Gospel of the Kingdom, with a critique of Bertrand Comparet's sermon, What Gospel?

In Matthew chapters 4 and 9, the apostle described Yahshua Christ as “preaching the gospel of the kingdom”, and then, much later and at the end of His ministry, in Matthew chapter 24 Christ Himself is recorded as having said “14 And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come.” These words are quite ominous, as Christ Himself equates the fulfillment of the age with the preaching of the Gospel of the Kingdom. So the preaching of the Gospel of the Kingdom will usher in the fulfillment of the age and the return of Christ. However the Gospel of Christ has been preached in diverse manners for two thousand years, and the end has not yet come. So we must ask, was Christ wrong, or could it be that the gospel of the churches is not the Gospel of the Kingdom? Here we hope to answer that question.

In the gospel of Mark, in Mark chapter 1 we read “14 Now after that John was put in prison, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God, 15 And saying, The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand: repent ye, and believe the gospel.” But the time which was fulfilled was that of the coming and purpose of the Messiah, and not necessarily that of the end of the age. Christ Himself, as it is recorded in Luke chapter 4, had cited a portion of Isaiah chapter 61 in reference to Himself, where He said that He had come “2 To proclaim the acceptable year of the LORD…” But we know that it was not yet the end of the age because He stopped short of citing the rest of the passage, which continues and says “… and the day of vengeance of our God; to comfort all that mourn; 3 To appoint unto them that mourn in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the LORD, that he might be glorified.” This we await with His promised return.

Birth Pangs of the Coming Age, a Review of a Sermon by Bertrand Comparet

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Birth pangs of the Coming Age

Here I am going to present and critique a sermon by Bertrand Comparet, titled Birth pangs of the Coming Age. While Comparet had excellent insight in many respects, in others it would be difficult to miss the proverbial handwriting on the wall. Yet none of us can really ever know exactly what lies over the horizon, so sometimes even the most visible trends don’t always result in the conditions or outcomes that we may have imagined beforehand. As I have said many times in the past, prophecy does not exist so that we can see the future, but rather, so that once it unfolds we can look back and know that God is true.

Like most of Comparet’s sermons, it is difficult to know exactly when this was written or delivered. But here he has helped us by mentioning a 1967 event in its last paragraph. His remarks on the struggles between the interests of capital and organized labor remind me of the newspaper headlines relating to that same thing, which were ubiquitous throughout the early 1970’s. So if I had to guess, I would date this sermon around 1974 to 1976, right around the same time that former Teamster’s union leader Jimmy Hoffa had disappeared.

Aside from the visible trends, who could foresee things such as the so-called coronavirus pandemic? Not that we believe in the pandemic, since in my opinion it is a hoax, or at the very least, the hype is a hoax, which I had first stated here well over two months ago. Several years ago Bill Gates “predicted” such a pandemic, at the same time that he was investing billions of dollars in pharmaceutical companies and giving large grants to certain scientific research institutions to create it for him. So Gates really isn’t a prophet, but a conspirator. Now the pandemic which his cabal had created is being used to decimate small businesses and the personal finances of tens or even hundreds of millions of people, to test the effectiveness of population control, and certainly the level of population obedience not only to government, but also the level of compliance with what they are told by mainstream media. In the aftermath of all this, we will know for sure that most people will comply even with the poisoning of their own bodies.

The Whole Armor of Yahweh, a presentation and review of a sermon by Bertrand Comparet

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The Whole Armor of Yahweh, a presentation and review of a sermon by Bertrand Comparet

I thought to take one more moment of reflection on the current world circumstances and how Christians should face them, before returning to my commentary On the Gospel of John, which I hope to do next week. So once again, I will use the opportunity to present and critique a sermon by one of our notable Christian Identity predecessors, this time by Bertrand Comparet. This is The Whole Armor of Yahweh, which is certainly what we shall need to withstand all of the fiery darts of the devils who seem to be everywhere and all-powerful.

It is difficult not to talk about the hype over the so-called novel coronavirus, and whether or not the virus is a greater threat to human life than any other seasonal flu virus ????. The numbers are not at all convincing, the methods by which they are accounted are far less convincing, and I sincerely believe, as I wrote a month ago, that the hype is a hoax which has been perpetrated through the media and progressive politicians along with others of the so-called “rulers of this world” to push all of us further down the road to tyranny and plunge us into what we may call world communism. In fact, by now it should be evident to most of us that we are already living under tyranny, except that most of us are blindly complying to a government which is operating as if it were God. If this goes on too much longer, the largest banks and corporations will end up owing everything that they don’t already own, and the government is clearly in collusion.

The Time of the Heathen – a Critical Review of a sermon by Bertrand Comparet

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I really don’t like to discuss news or current events, but this evening I have a short program, so I will take a few minutes to discuss the latest media scare, coronavirus. The notes for this are found at the Christogenea Forum, where I am certain there will be further discussion.

The Time of the Heathen – a Critical Review of a sermon by Bertrand Comparet

While I admire and respect Bertrand Comparet as a trailblazer in developing and spreading the truth of our Christian Identity profession, I also believe that his message had a lot of flaws. But some of his errors were merely due to the time in which he lived, and if I had also lived then, doing what I do now, I may well have repeated them. This is because Comparet’s view of eschatology was a product of the Cold War, and apparently, he did not see any possibilities of an end-of-the-world scenario which may have transcended that age of apparent conflict.

But other flaws can evidently be attributed to the fact that his message was not fully developed, and for that reason it had some internal conflicts. For example, while Comparet recognized that there were goat nations and sheep nations, which were genetic races of people with contrary destinies, and of course he also knew that the identity of the sheep was with modern White Europeans, he sometimes also looked at goat nations as if they could somehow be allies of the sheep, and here he clearly makes that mistake.

A Critical Review of The Sheep and The Goats, by Bertrand Comparet

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A Critical Review of The Sheep and The Goats, by Bertrand Comparet

On tape this was actually only a ten-minute sermon, but we may make it a 75-minute discussion. I have included a copy of the original sermon below. As with all of the Comparet sermons transcribed by Jeanne Snyder and then digitized by Clifton Emahiser, some editing and changes were made, so none of these are word-for-word from Comparet, but they are close enough to be accurate representations of what he said. But I cannot even know if the audio version which I have is the same as what Jeanne had originally transcribed.

I remember first learning about Christian Identity from a small collection of books that did not say much at all about those races which were outside of the Scriptures, or at least, which were not direct subjects of the Scriptures. There was E. Raymond Capt’s Abrahamic Covenant, Bertrand Comparet’s Your Heritage, Robert Balacius’ Uncovering the Mysteries of Your Hidden Inheritance, even William Cameron’s The Covenant People. Cameron is more famous for his work on The International Jew for Henry Ford’s paper, The Dearborn Independent, but few people familiar with that also know that Cameron was an Identity Christian. At that early time I also read quite a few things from Wesley Swift, and also from Richard Kelly Hoskins, Howard Rand, Frederick Haberman, and at least half dozen other Identity writers.

Back then I also subscribed to a paper called The Jubilee, printed somewhere in the Pacific Northwest, I think in Oregon, which in each issue had run an article by Ted Weiland. So in hindsight, it is not a wonder the paper was rather soft on the race issue, and even then I recognized Weiland’s universalism. So I never read more than a couple of his articles, and I never renewed the subscription. But after reading a few dozen or so Identity books and a host of other materials – although I don’t remember exactly how much I read, as this was back in 1997 and early 1998 – I began to realize that there were vast differences of opinions among various Identity writers concerning certain very important subjects.

The Higher Calling, a review of a sermon by Bertrand Comparet

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The Higher Calling, a review of a Sermon by Bertrand Comparet

Perhaps it is fitting that each time I begin a review of a sermon by Comparet or Swift, or an essay by Emahiser, that I do so with reflections on my own early Christian Identity studies. However I had originally embarked on my studies because I was compelled by sermons such as these from Comparet or Swift, and I was helped along the way by Emahiser.

This sermon, however, is important to me because it shows that regarding one critical issue, I have always generally agreed with Comparet, while many other Christian Identity pastors or teachers and their followers have different opinions which are not so well-grounded in Scripture. Often, those who have disagreed with me on this issue have even attributed to Comparet a position which he did not hold. That critical issue is the fact that all Israel shall be saved.

That “all Israel shall be saved”, the Bible states rather plainly, as it is found in both the letters of Paul in Romans chapter 11 and in the prophecy of Isaiah in chapter 45. The Scriptures also lead us to make the same implication in many other places. But in spite of that, many Identity Christians argue against it, and even despise us for holding to the assertion. However we would assert that their doctrines are remnants of their denominational baggage, and they are not founded in Scripture.

There is one popular belief that is probably found in every Christian denomination, which is that people who are generally “good” in their patterns of behavior go to heaven, and people who are “bad” in their patterns of behavior, or who have been especially “bad” at one time or another, are in danger of going to hell forever. To that, the Roman Catholic Church added the concept of purgatory, as priests needed an angle by which to extort men out of their money, convincing them that their loved ones were stuck and couldn’t quite make it to heaven without the intervention of the priests.

Being raised Catholic to some degree, as a young man I had the same general understanding regarding these teachings on salvation, except that I don’t think I ever really believed, or perhaps only never cared about, the claims concerning purgatory. So when I found Christian Identity, sermons such as this made an impression which led me to inquire into these things more carefully, and when I began to actually study the Scriptures, especially in their original languages, the conclusions which I reached remained in general agreement with Comparet’s position on this issue, and perhaps the differences we may have are due only to semantic differences.

What is Religion?

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What is Religion?

When I first came to Christian Identity, I gave much thought to the meaning of the word religion. Perhaps this sermon by Bertrand Comparet, titled What is Religion?, had helped to stimulate that process. The primary definition of the word religion in the Oxford Dictionary is “the belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, especially a personal God or gods.” But although that is what it has come to mean, I believe the original sense of the Latin word from which it was derived has a much deeper meaning, and that this deeper meaning is relevant to our Christian Identity profession. The Latin word religio was used in a manner much like we use the word religion today. But the related word religo is a verb meaning to tie back or tie up, and religatio is a tying back or up. So, according to The New College Latin & English Dictionary, the word religiosus, which is probably the closest antecedent to our word religious, was used to refer to something which was “subject to religious claims, under religious liability.” Liability is “the state of being responsible for something”, so there is the connection to the meaning of the root word religo, in the sense of being tied or bound to a thing.

This in turn brings several Scriptures to mind. First, in Matthew chapter 18, we read in the words of Christ: “15 Moreover if thy brother shall trespass against thee, go and tell him his fault between thee and him alone: if he shall hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother. 16 But if he will not hear thee, then take with thee one or two more, that in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established. 17 And if he shall neglect to hear them, tell it unto the church [assembly]: but if he neglect to hear the church [assembly], let him be unto thee as an heathen man and a publican.” Then, after admonishing His disciples about sin and guilt and the need to reject men who do not accept correction along those lines, Yahshua Christ had also said “18 Verily I say unto you, Whatsoever ye shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever ye shall loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. 19 Again I say unto you, That if two of you shall agree on earth as touching any thing that they shall ask, it shall be done for them of my Father which is in heaven. 20 For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.” So binding and loosing are related to Christian fellowship and community, or communion, and that in turn is based on an abstention from sin and a keeping of the commandments of God. Paul’s example of such loosing is found in 1 Corinthians chapter 5, where he encouraged the assembly at Corinth to ostracize a fornicator from their community.

A Critical Review of Bertrand Comparet’s Sermon I COME AS A THIEF

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A Critical Review of Bertrand Comparet’s Sermon I COME AS A THIEF

Here we are going to present a critical review of Bertrand Comparet’s Sermon I Come as a Thief. Doing this, we may be especially hard on Comparet for his failed view of eschatology, but before we criticize him we will also admit that, if we had lived in his same era, we too may have fallen into the trap which he did, believing that the end of the age was going to come to its conclusion in the Cold War with the Soviet Union and a nuclear conflagration and invasion of the United States by Communist hordes.

But we now see that the Communist hordes were here all along, and they have already come to control practically everything of note in America. They are called Jews, and have deceived us with party politics and capitalist internationalism while making our Western nations safe for Marxism and a flood of non-White so-called immigrants. These devils were still under much deeper cover in the 1960’s when Comparet was writing, and even he did not see what was truly going to come.

However when we set aside the errors in Comparet’s eschatology, he is still correct in his principal, and that is because he did his best, in spite of the temptations to imagine the future, to adhere to the prophecy already given in Scripture, in both the Old Testament and in the words of Yahshua Christ. So even though the play on the world stage did not take the course that Comparet thought it might, his conclusions are certainly valid and his sermon worthy of review. So he begins:

A man cannot be a podiatrist and trim your toe corns without passing an examination to prove that he is competent to provide this service. But, any fool can become a legislator, and a lot of fools do become one. Consequently our laws, as a rule, are the products of unskilled labor. In trying to draft a statute, it isn't too difficult to word it so that anybody who is trying in good faith can understand it. The big problem is to word it so that somebody who is trying in bad faith, to misunderstand it, can't do so.

Christianity in the Old Testament, Part 6, Israel in the New Testament, by Bertrand Comparet, with Commentary

 

Christianity in the Old Testament, Part 6, Israel in the New Testament, by Bertrand Comparet, with Commentary

Here we are going to present, critique, and hopefully elaborate on Bertrand Comparet’s sermon, Israel in the New Testament. These programs are intended to both honor and elaborate on the works of Bertrand Comparet, and to offer any corrections which are necessary, because all men are prone to making errors, and no man can avoid that fate. We are doing this as part of our series on Christianity in the Old Testament because the two subjects are actually a single subject. Comparet himself referred to this sermon in his original presentation of Christianity in the Old Testament. Regardless of the propaganda which is spewed by the denominational churches, both the Old and New Testaments represent racially-based covenants made with the same group of people. One may pick-and-choose passages in the New Testament in order to attempt to dispute that, but those passages are being taken out-of-context when such interpretations can be clearly shown to conflict with many plain statements made in either Testament which refute the validity of any universalist interpretation.

To the sincere Christian, Judaism should have no standing or consideration whatsoever. The promise of a future new covenant was made explicitly in both Jeremiah and Ezekiel. The condemnation revoking the old covenant was spelled out explicitly in both Hosea and Zechariah. The Jews as a people have never fulfilled any of the many promises made to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob concerning the children of Israel. They will never fulfill them, because the Old Testament is a Christian book. With all certainty, it can be shown in history that the Keltic and Germanic peoples have their origins in ancient Israel and Mesopotamia, and that they did indeed fulfill all of those promises. They also accepted the new covenant that was explicitly promised for Israel, and they accepted Yahshua Christ the Messiah of Israel, who came “to confirm the promises made unto the fathers”, as Paul of Tarsus attests. This is the basic premise of Bertrand Comparet’s sermon, it is a true premise, and now we shall commence to hear it from him...

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